Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type bool in /home/mhd-01/www.ateatro.info/htdocs/wp-content/themes/consulting/partials/content-post_details.php on line 8

Notice: Trying to get property 'slug' of non-object in /home/mhd-01/www.ateatro.info/htdocs/wp-content/themes/consulting/partials/content-post_details.php on line 8

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type bool in /home/mhd-01/www.ateatro.info/htdocs/wp-content/themes/consulting/partials/content-post_details.php on line 9

Notice: Trying to get property 'slug' of non-object in /home/mhd-01/www.ateatro.info/htdocs/wp-content/themes/consulting/partials/content-post_details.php on line 9
Stampa questo copione

BLOW
by David McKenna and Nick Cassavetes

                                                              ON BLACK:

     "A MAN MUST LOOK AT HIS LIFE AND THINK LUXURY."

     FADE IN:

     EXT. GUARJIRA, COLOMBIA - 1989 - DAY

     A majestic panorama of the lush green slopes that are the

     Columbian highlands.  A faint chopping sound IS HEARD and

     then another.  WHOOSH.  WHOOSH.  The view changes and tiny

     dots appear on the hillside vegetation.  WHOOSH.

     CLOSER

     We realize the dots are people.  Workers swinging long steel

     machetes in slow methodical rhythm.  WHOOSH.  WHOOSH.  WE SEE

     the South American Indian MEN clearly now.  Their tar stained

     teeth.  Their gaunt faces riddled with crow's feet.  Their

     jaws chewing away on huge wads of coca leaves as they collect

     the harvest.

     EXT. DIRT ROAD - COLOMBIA - DAY

     Old rickety trucks carrying the huge green tractor-sized

     bales speed along the narrow road.

     EXT. CLEARING - COLOMBIA - DAY

     The bundles are undone and Columbian women separate out the

     leaves.  Tribes of underweight workers carry armload after

     armload of the harvest and ritualistically dump them into a

     gigantic cannibal pot which sits on top of a raging bonfire.

     The leaves are being boiled down and a huge plume of smoke

     streaks the sky.  Wizened Indios brave the heat and shovel

     ashes into the pot to cool the solution.

     INT. JUNGLE - COLOMBIA - DAY

     A primitive but enormous makeshift lab contains all the

     equipment.  The machinery.  The solutions.  The over-sized

     vats.  Dark-skinned bandoleros smoke cigarettes and sport

     automatic weapons at all the points of entry.  The coca is

     now a "basuco" paste and is being sent in for a wash.

     INT. LABORATORY - COLOMBIA - 1989 - DAY

     A conveyor belt pours out brick after brick of pure cocaine

     hydrochloride.  The bricks are wrapped, tied up, weighed, and

     stamped with a "P" before being thrown into duffel bags.

     EXT. JUNGLE AIRSTRIP - COLOMBIA - DAY

     A small twin-engine Cessna is loaded with dozens of duffel

     bags and the plane takes off.

     EXT. VERO BEACH AIRFIELD - NIGHT

     The Cessna touches down.

     EXT. WORKSITE - WEYMOUTH - 1966 - DAY

     The worksite is busy.  George is amongst other workers,

     working a summer job.  As George is taking five, he looks

     across the sight to Fred, who is sweeping up debris.  A long

     way from being the boss.

     INT. COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICE - WEYMOUTH - 1966 - DAY

     George stands in line to register for college, wearing his

     Brooks Brothers suit, bowtie, and freshly Bryllcreamed hair.

     The room is crowded and the line is long.  Bob Dylan's

     "Subterranean Homesick Blues" blares out of one of the kid's

     transistor radios.  George looks around the room.  He is

     uncomfortable.  He catches his reflection in the shiny glass

     partition and stops.  He doesn't like what he sees.

     Something is not right.  He looks like everyone else.  Same

     cookie-cutter hair, same cookie-cutter clothes, same cookie

     cutter faces.  He's a carbon copy.

                             REGISTRATION WOMAN

             Next.

     It's George's turn but he doesn't hear it.  "Twenty years of

     schooling and they put you on a day shift."  The words hit

     him like a tone of bricks as he continues to stare at his own

     reflection.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             I was standing there, and it was like

             the outside of me and the inside of me

             didn't match, you know?  And then I

             looked around the room and it hit me.  I

             saw my whole life.  Where I was gonna

             live, what type of car I'd drive, who my

             neighbors would be.  I saw it all and I

             didn't want it.  Not that life.

     EXT. CONSTRUCTION SITE - WEYMOUTH - 1966 - DAY

     George sits with Fred.  It's breaktime and Fred eats from a

     lunch box.

                             GEORGE

             There's something out there for me, Dad.

             Something different.  Something free

             form, you know?  Something for me, and

             college just isn't it.

                             FRED

             That's too bad.  You would have been the

             first one in the family.

                             GEORGE

             I know.

                             FRED

             Alright.  You want me to get your old

             job back?  Because I could, you know, I

             could put in that word.

                             GEORGE

             No, Dad.  I don't want to...I mean, I

             just don't want...

     It's obvious to Fred that his son doesn't want to be like

     him.

                             FRED

             What are you going to do?

                             GEORGE

             I'm going to California.

     EXT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT - 1968 - DAY

     SUPERIMPOSE: MANHATTAN BEACH, CALIFORNIA 1968

     George and Tuna, now 21-years old, struggle with their bags.

     Their new place is a tackily furnished, two-story apartment

     with small balconies and a view of the ocean.  As George and

     Tuna struggle with the bags, two California beauties appear

     on the balcony next door: BARBARA BUCKLEY, 20, and MARIA

     GONZALES, 21.

                             GIRLS

             You guys need some help?

     George and Tuna share a look.

                             TUNA

             I don't know about you, but I think

             we're gonna like it here.

     EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - DAY

     SERIES OF SHOTS

     Barbara and Maria introduce George and Tuna around to the

     Manhattan Beach regulars.  They are immediately accepted

     despite their ill fitting shorts and Tuna's unhip black

     socks.  The beach scene is one big party.  Lots of beer,

     music, bikinis, and good times.  By the end of the day,

     George and Tuna have a hundred new friends.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             California was like nothing I'd ever

             experienced.  The people were liberated

             and independent and full of new ideas.

                             GEORGE (V.O.) (CONT'D)

             They used words like "right on,"

             "groovy," and "solid."  The women are

             all beautiful and seemed to share the

             same occupation.

                             WOMAN #1

             I'm a flight attendant.

                             WOMAN #2

             I'm a flight attendant.

                             WOMAN #3

             I'm a flight attendant.

     The weed comes out and is passed around.  Pipes.  Joints.

     Bongs.  In SLOW MOTION, Barbara takes a huge hit of grass,

     grabs George's face, french kissing him, and giving him a

     huge shotgun.

     INT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT - 1968 - DAY

     George and Barbara are sleeping late.  Their bodies

     intertwined beneath the sheets.  A slam of the front door

     wakes them up.  It's Tuna.

                             TUNA

             Hey, wake up.  Come on, you two

             lovebirds.  Hurry, I want to show you

             something.

     George and Barbara shake cobwebs out and stumble into the

     kitchen to find Tuna holding a brown paper shopping bag.

                             TUNA (CONT'D)

             Figured it out.

                             GEORGE

             Figured what out?

                             TUNA

             You know how we were wondering what we

             were going to do for money?  Being how

             we don't want to get jobs and whatnot?

             Well, check this out.

     Tuna takes the paper bag and empties its contents on the

     kitchen table.  It's a grey mound of stocky, seedy marijuana.

     Barbara examines the reefer.

                             BARBARA

             Tuna, this is crap.

                             TUNA

             I know it's not the greatest.  It's

             commercial.

                             BARBARA

             It's garbage.

                             GEORGE

             It's oregano.  You got ripped off, pal.

             What are you gonna do with all this?

                             TUNA

             We sell it.  I got it all figured out.

             We make three finger lids and sell them

             on the beach.  We move all of it.  We've

             made ourselves a hundred bucks.  Or a

             lot of weed for our head.  What do you

             think?  Not bad, huh?  I got the baggies

             and everything.

                             BARBARA

             You can't sell this to your friends.

                             TUNA

             Man.  Fuck you guys.  I have this great

             idea and you guys have to be all

             skeptical.

                             BARBARA

             Look, if you really wanna score some

             dope, I got the guy.

     EXT. THE WHIPPING POST - MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - DAY

     George, Barbara and Tuna stop outside the front door.

                             GEORGE

             Are you sure this guy is cool?

                             BARBARA

             You'll see for yourself.

                             TUNA

             A beauty parlor for men?  Sounds pretty

             queer.

     They walk in.

     INT. THE WHIPPING POST - MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - CONTINUOUS

     George, Tuna and Barbara enter.  The Whipping Post is

     California's first male hair salon.  George looks around at

     the customer's being pampered.  Haircuts, pedicures,

     manicures.

                             GEORGE

             Nothing like this back home.

                             BARBARA

             Derek!

     DEREK FOREAL is a curious man.  Daringly effeminate,

     especially for the sixties, he is always surrounded by

     beautiful women.  As he sees Barbara, he stops his haircut

     and runs to embrace her.

                             DEREK

             Barbie!

     Derek's female entourage rush over as well.  Kisses all

     around.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             So, this is the new man, huh?  He's

             cute!

     George and Tuna stick out there hands.

                             GEORGE

             George.

                             TUNA

             Tuna.

                             DEREK

             Tuna, oh my.  Enchante, George.  Barbie,

             he's yummy.  He looks like a Ken doll.

             Oooh, Ken and Barbie.  It's perfect.

             Alright, girls, give me five minutes.

     Derek makes dismissing gestures and the girls scatter.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             Everyone, shoo!  You, too, Barbie.  I

             want to talk to the boys alone.

     After the girls leave, Derek closes the partition and his

     playful demeanor changes.  He's all business now.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             What can I do for you guys?

                             GEORGE

             We want some grass.

                             DEREK

             I know what you want.  But, first of

             all, are you cops?

                             GEORGE

             No.

                             DEREK

             Because if you are, you have to tell me.

             If not, it's entrapment.

                             GEORGE

             We're not cops.  We're from

             Massachusettes.  I mean, does he look

             like a cop?

                             DEREK

             I guess not.  Okay.  You know, you're

             very lucky you're friends of Barbie's.

             If you weren't, I'd never talk to you.

     Derek pulls a television-sized brick of quality marijuana out

     from under a sink and sets it down in front of George.

                             GEORGE

             What the fuck is that?

                             DEREK

             It's your grass.

                             TUNA

             Wow.  That's more than we had in mind.

                             DEREK

             I don't nickel and dime.  You want it or

             not?

     George and Tuna look at each other.

                             GEORGE

             We'll take it.

     EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - DAY

     SERIES OF SHOTS

     Summer on the beach.  It's one big party.  George and Tuna

     are on the beach.  They are the new kings.  They smoke pot

     and drink brews.

     George and Barbara get close as do Tuna and Maria.  Slowly,

     George's clothes and hair start to look better, cooler.

     George and Tuna hanging out with the SURFERS.

     George and Tuna hang with Barbara, Maria and SOME GIRLFRIENDS

     in bikinis.

     George and Barbara hang together at the life guard stand.

     George and Tuna on the strand with HIPPY PROFESSORS selling

     half-ounces.

     Derek, Tuna, George, Barbara, Maria and the Elves play

     volleyball.

     Barbecue at Belmont Shores apartment with George, Barbara,

     Derek, Tuna, Maria and different Elves.

     George and Tuna sell half-ounces to BIKERS.

     Derek is having a party out of a mini-van in the beach

     parking lot.  George, Barbara, Tuna and Maria are there.

     EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - SUNSET

     George and Barbara sit by the water, watching the waves crash

     into the sand.  The sky is streaked with purple and red.

                             GEORGE

             This is it for me.

                             BARBARA

             What is?

                             GEORGE

             Just everything.  You.  California.  The

             beach.  This spot right here.  I feel

             like I belong here, you know?  It just

             feels right.

                             BARBARA

             You happy, baby?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.  I am.

     EXT. WORKSITE - WEYMOUTH - 1966 - DAY

     The worksite is busy.  George is amongst other workers,

     working a summer job.  As George is taking five, he looks

     across the sight to Fred, who is sweeping up debris.  A long

     way from being the boss.

     INT. COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICE - WEYMOUTH - 1966 - DAY

     George stands in line to register for college, wearing his

     Brooks Brothers suit, bowtie, and freshly Bryllcreamed hair.

     The room is crowded and the line is long.  Bob Dylan's

     "Subterranean Homesick Blues" blares out of one of the kid's

     transistor radios.  George looks around the room.  He is

     uncomfortable.  He catches his reflection in the shiny glass

     partition and stops.  He doesn't like what he sees.

     Something is not right.  He looks like everyone else.  Same

     cookie-cutter hair, same cookie-cutter clothes, same cookie

     cutter faces.  He's a carbon copy.

                             REGISTRATION WOMAN

             Next.

     It's George's turn but he doesn't hear it.  "Twenty years of

     schooling and they put you on a day shift."  The words hit

     him like a tone of bricks as he continues to stare at his own

     reflection.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             I was standing there, and it was like

             the outside of me and the inside of me

             didn't match, you know?  And then I

             looked around the room and it hit me.  I

             saw my whole life.  Where I was gonna

             live, what type of car I'd drive, who my

             neighbors would be.  I saw it all and I

             didn't want it.  Not that life.

     EXT. CONSTRUCTION SITE - WEYMOUTH - 1966 - DAY

     George sits with Fred.  It's breaktime and Fred eats from a

     lunch box.

                             GEORGE

             There's something out there for me, Dad.

             Something different.  Something free

             form, you know?  Something for me, and

             college just isn't it.

                             FRED

             That's too bad.  You would have been the

             first one in the family.

                             GEORGE

             I know.

                             FRED

             Alright.  You want me to get your old

             job back?  Because I could, you know, I

             could put in that word.

                             GEORGE

             No, Dad.  I don't want to...I mean, I

             just don't want...

     It's obvious to Fred that his son doesn't want to be like

     him.

                             FRED

             What are you going to do?

                             GEORGE

             I'm going to California.

     EXT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT - 1968 - DAY

     SUPERIMPOSE: MANHATTAN BEACH, CALIFORNIA 1968

     George and Tuna, now 21-years old, struggle with their bags.

     Their new place is a tackily furnished, two-story apartment

     with small balconies and a view of the ocean.  As George and

     Tuna struggle with the bags, two California beauties appear

     on the balcony next door: BARBARA BUCKLEY, 20, and MARIA

     GONZALES, 21.

                             GIRLS

             You guys need some help?

     George and Tuna share a look.

                             TUNA

             I don't know about you, but I think

             we're gonna like it here.

     EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - DAY

     SERIES OF SHOTS

     Barbara and Maria introduce George and Tuna around to the

     Manhattan Beach regulars.  They are immediately accepted

     despite their ill fitting shorts and Tuna's unhip black

     socks.  The beach scene is one big party.  Lots of beer,

     music, bikinis, and good times.  By the end of the day,

     George and Tuna have a hundred new friends.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             California was like nothing I'd ever

             experienced.  The people were liberated

             and independent and full of new ideas.

                             GEORGE (V.O.) (CONT'D)

             They used words like "right on,"

             "groovy," and "solid."  The women are

             all beautiful and seemed to share the

             same occupation.

                             WOMAN #1

             I'm a flight attendant.

                             WOMAN #2

             I'm a flight attendant.

                             WOMAN #3

             I'm a flight attendant.

     The weed comes out and is passed around.  Pipes.  Joints.

     Bongs.  In SLOW MOTION, Barbara takes a huge hit of grass,

     grabs George's face, french kissing him, and giving him a

     huge shotgun.

     INT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT - 1968 - DAY

     George and Barbara are sleeping late.  Their bodies

     intertwined beneath the sheets.  A slam of the front door

     wakes them up.  It's Tuna.

                             TUNA

             Hey, wake up.  Come on, you two

             lovebirds.  Hurry, I want to show you

             something.

     George and Barbara shake cobwebs out and stumble into the

     kitchen to find Tuna holding a brown paper shopping bag.

                             TUNA (CONT'D)

             Figured it out.

                             GEORGE

             Figured what out?

                             TUNA

             You know how we were wondering what we

             were going to do for money?  Being how

             we don't want to get jobs and whatnot?

             Well, check this out.

     Tuna takes the paper bag and empties its contents on the

     kitchen table.  It's a grey mound of stocky, seedy marijuana.

     Barbara examines the reefer.

                             BARBARA

             Tuna, this is crap.

                             TUNA

             I know it's not the greatest.  It's

             commercial.

                             BARBARA

             It's garbage.

                             GEORGE

             It's oregano.  You got ripped off, pal.

             What are you gonna do with all this?

                             TUNA

             We sell it.  I got it all figured out.

             We make three finger lids and sell them

             on the beach.  We move all of it.  We've

             made ourselves a hundred bucks.  Or a

             lot of weed for our head.  What do you

             think?  Not bad, huh?  I got the baggies

             and everything.

                             BARBARA

             You can't sell this to your friends.

                             TUNA

             Man.  Fuck you guys.  I have this great

             idea and you guys have to be all

             skeptical.

                             BARBARA

             Look, if you really wanna score some

             dope, I got the guy.

     EXT. THE WHIPPING POST - MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - DAY

     George, Barbara and Tuna stop outside the front door.

                             GEORGE

             Are you sure this guy is cool?

                             BARBARA

             You'll see for yourself.

                             TUNA

             A beauty parlor for men?  Sounds pretty

             queer.

     They walk in.

     INT. THE WHIPPING POST - MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - CONTINUOUS

     George, Tuna and Barbara enter.  The Whipping Post is

     California's first male hair salon.  George looks around at

     the customer's being pampered.  Haircuts, pedicures,

     manicures.

                             GEORGE

             Nothing like this back home.

                             BARBARA

             Derek!

     DEREK FOREAL is a curious man.  Daringly effeminate,

     especially for the sixties, he is always surrounded by

     beautiful women.  As he sees Barbara, he stops his haircut

     and runs to embrace her.

                             DEREK

             Barbie!

     Derek's female entourage rush over as well.  Kisses all

     around.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             So, this is the new man, huh?  He's

             cute!

     George and Tuna stick out there hands.

                             GEORGE

             George.

                             TUNA

             Tuna.

                             DEREK

             Tuna, oh my.  Enchante, George.  Barbie,

             he's yummy.  He looks like a Ken doll.

             Oooh, Ken and Barbie.  It's perfect.

             Alright, girls, give me five minutes.

     Derek makes dismissing gestures and the girls scatter.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             Everyone, shoo!  You, too, Barbie.  I

             want to talk to the boys alone.

     After the girls leave, Derek closes the partition and his

     playful demeanor changes.  He's all business now.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             What can I do for you guys?

                             GEORGE

             We want some grass.

                             DEREK

             I know what you want.  But, first of

             all, are you cops?

                             GEORGE

             No.

                             DEREK

             Because if you are, you have to tell me.

             If not, it's entrapment.

                             GEORGE

             We're not cops.  We're from

             Massachusettes.  I mean, does he look

             like a cop?

                             DEREK

             I guess not.  Okay.  You know, you're

             very lucky you're friends of Barbie's.

             If you weren't, I'd never talk to you.

     Derek pulls a television-sized brick of quality marijuana out

     from under a sink and sets it down in front of George.

                             GEORGE

             What the fuck is that?

                             DEREK

             It's your grass.

                             TUNA

             Wow.  That's more than we had in mind.

                             DEREK

             I don't nickel and dime.  You want it or

             not?

     George and Tuna look at each other.

                             GEORGE

             We'll take it.

             EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - DAY

     SERIES OF SHOTS

     Summer on the beach.  It's one big party.  George and Tuna

     are on the beach.  They are the new kings.  They smoke pot

     and drink brews.

     George and Barbara get close as do Tuna and Maria.  Slowly,

     George's clothes and hair start to look better, cooler.

     George and Tuna hanging out with the SURFERS.

     George and Tuna hang with Barbara, Maria and SOME GIRLFRIENDS

     in bikinis.

     George and Barbara hang together at the life guard stand.

     George and Tuna on the strand with HIPPY PROFESSORS selling

     half-ounces.

     Derek, Tuna, George, Barbara, Maria and the Elves play

     volleyball.

     Barbecue at Belmont Shores apartment with George, Barbara,

     Derek, Tuna, Maria and different Elves.

     George and Tuna sell half-ounces to BIKERS.

     Derek is having a party out of a mini-van in the beach

     parking lot.  George, Barbara, Tuna and Maria are there.

     EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - SUNSET

     George and Barbara sit by the water, watching the waves crash

     into the sand.  The sky is streaked with purple and red.

                             GEORGE

             This is it for me.

                             BARBARA

             What is?

                             GEORGE

             Just everything.  You.  California.  The

             beach.  This spot right here.  I feel

             like I belong here, you know?  It just

             feels right.

                             BARBARA

             You happy, baby?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.  I am.

     INT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT - 1968 - DAY

     George walks in to find Tuna and Maria sitting with KEVIN

     DULLI, an old friend from back east.  He's sitting in front

     of a water pipe and coughing his ass off.

                             TUNA

             Look what the cat dragged in.

                             GEORGE

             Holy shit, Dulli.  What the hell are you

             doing here?

                             KEVIN

             Well, I'll tell you.  I was walking down

             the beach, minding my business, when who

             did I see but this fucking guy.  I

             didn't know you guys were living in

             California.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, but what are you doing out here?

                             KEVIN

             I'm on vacation.  On my way back to

             school.

                             GEORGE

             This calls for a joint.  You want to do

             the honors?

                             KEVIN

             No, man.  I'm too fucked up.

                             TUNA

             Nice weed, huh?

                             KEVIN

             Fuck yeah.  I never seen nothing like

             it.  I'm fucking wasted.

                             GEORGE

             Right on.

                             KEVIN

             G-d, I'm stoned.  I'm stoned.  I'm

             really...

                             GEORGE

             Stoned?

                             KEVIN

             I wish there was shit like this back

             home.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah?

                             KEVIN

             Shit, yeah.  Do you know how much money

             I could make if I had this stuff back

             east?

                             TUNA

             No shit, Kevin?

                             KEVIN

             That's right.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah?

                             KEVIN

             When there's something to move, it's too

             easy not to.  Do you know how many

             colleges are in a twenty mile radius?

             U. Mass, Amherst, B.U....

                             TUNA

             Smith.  Hampshire....

                             KEVIN

             Right.  And Holyoke.  There are a

             hundred thousand rich kids with their

             parents' money to spend, but there's

             never anything available.  Nothing good,

             anyway.  I'm paying four hundred dollars

             for shit.

     INT. THE WHIPPING POST - MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - DAY

     Derek, George and Barbara sit around.  The blinds are drawn.

                             GEORGE

             The way we figure it, Barbara flies to

             Boston twice a week.  Two bags per

             flight.  Twenty-five pounds in each bag.

                             DEREK

             You're kidding, right?  That's a hundred

             pounds a week.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, I know, it's a lot of weight.

                             BARBARA

             We're gonna call it California

             sinsemilla.  Sounds exotic.

                             GEORGE

             I'm telling you, Derek, it will sell.

                             DEREK

             I don't know...

                             GEORGE

             Here's the best part.  We can charge

             five-hundred a pound.

                             DEREK

             Come on, George, no one is going to pay

             that.

                             GEORGE

             It's already been negotiated.  It's

             done.  The money is there waiting.

     Derek looks at Barbara.  She nods.

                             DEREK

             Goodness.

                             GEORGE

             Goodness is right.  If you do the math,

             that's over thirty grand a week profit.

             I want you to be my partner on this,

             Derek.  Fifty-fifty.  That's fifteen

             thousand a week for you, my friend.  In

             your pocket, free and clear.

                             DEREK

             And I only deal with you?

                             GEORGE

             Barbara and me.  No one else.

     Derek thinks about it.

                             BARBARA

             It's gonna work, Derek.

                             DEREK

             I don't know.  East coast.  Airplanes.

             It all sounds pretty risky.

                             GEORGE

             She's a flight attendant.  They don't

             check her bags.

     EXT. LOS ANGELES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT - 1968 - DAY

     George drops Barbara off in her uniform curbside.  They kiss

     and she walks away with two big, red Samsonites.  She checks

     them with a SKYCAP and tips him.

     EXT. SKY - 1968 - DAY

     A huge jet goes right to left through frame.

     INT. LOGAN AIRPORT - GATE - BOSTON - 1968 - DAY

     Barbara is greeted by KEVIN DULLI with a hug.  A baggage

     claim check is slipped into Kevin's hand.

                             BARBARA

             Any message?

                             KEVIN

             Keep it coming.

     INT. LOGAN AIRPORT - BAGGAGE CLAIM - BOSTON - 1968

     We see Barbara's two red Samsonites being taken off the belt

     by Kevin.

     INT. LOGAN AIRPORT - GATE - BOSTON - 1968

     Same scene repeated, except different clothes on all.  Maybe

     Kevin is dressed a little better.

                             KEVIN

             More.

     INT. LOGAN AIRPORT - GATE - BOSTON - 1968

     The same scene repeated, same things changed again; now Kevin

     is definitely dressed a little better.

                             KEVIN

             I need more.

                             BARBARA

             What do you want me to do?  I can only

             take two bags, and I can't fly back here

             everyday.

                             KEVIN

             I know, but I've got a feeding frenzy on

             my hands.  Tell George this is small

             potatoes.  We're missing out on some

             serious cash.  You tell George.  He'll

             think of something.

     EXT. WINNEBAGO - 1968 - DAY

     MUSIC CUE:

     Tuna drives the big Winny.  Maria rides shotgun.  Barrelling

     cross-country, it's a party on wheels.

     EXT. WHITE OAK LODGE - AMHERST - 1968 - NIGHT

     Kevin and his girl, RADA, are the welcoming committee as the

     RV pulls into the parking lot.  They wave, slap the sides of

     the Winnebago, and greet the prodigal sons with hugs and

     handshakes.

     INT. WHITE OAK LODGE - AMHERST - 1968 - LATER

     George's room is rustic and plush.  A log fire burns and

     empty champagne bottles adorn the surroundings.  The girls

     have taken to each other.  The music is loud, and they dance

     while the boys do business.  Kevin counts out the money.

     It's stacked in piles all over the table.

                             KEVIN

             Twenty, forty, sixty, eighty, nine.

             Twenty, forty, sixty, eighty, a

             thousand.  It's all there.  Wow.  A

             hundred and twenty-eight thousand

             dollars.

                             TUNA

             Jesus Christ, I'm getting a boner just

             looking at it.

     But George isn't paying attention.  His wheels are turning.

                             KEVIN

             What's the matter, George?  Something

             wrong?  You look like you just fucked

             your mother.

                             TUNA

             Cheer up, man.  Half this money is ours.

             We're fucking rich.

                             GEORGE

             It's not enough.

                             KEVIN

             What?

                             TUNA

             What the fuck are you talking about,

             man?

                             GEORGE

             The set-up is wrong.  We're doing all

             the legwork, and at the end of the day,

             we're still paying retail.  We're

             getting middled.

                             KEVIN

             So?

                             GEORGE

             So, we need to get to the source.

                             TUNA

             Source?  What about Derek?

                             GEORGE

             He's getting middled, too.  And Derek's

             our partner.  What's good for us is good

             for him.

                             KEVIN

             Okay.  So we need a source.  Where do we

             start?

                             GEORGE

             Who speaks Spanish?

     EXT. PUERTO VALLARTA - MEXICO - 1968 - DAY

     MUSIC CUE.

     SUPERIMPOSE: PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

     We PAN OFF the beautiful waters of Puerto Vallarta.  This is

     a local beach on a Saturday afternoon.  The girls on the

     beach are drinking coco-locos and swimming.

     SERIES OF SHOTS - THE GANG LOOKING FOR A CONNECTION

     George with a bartender.

     Tuna and Dulli with cabbies.

     George and Derek talking with a local man, RAMON, at a corner

     bar.

     Barbara, Maria and Rada talk with local girls.

     EXT. OCEANA BAR - PUERTO VALLARTA - 1968 - DAY

                             TUNA

             This is bullshit, George.  We're never

             going to find anything down there.

                             KEVIN

             You know, he's got a point.  We're

             fucking Americans.  We stick out like

             sore thumbs.

                             DEREK

             I don't think so.

                             GEORGE

             You guys are such babies.  You want to

             go home, go.  Me, I'm not going to stop

             until I find the fucking motherlode.

                             RADA

             Georgie, we're gonna get busted if we

             keep this up.

                             GEORGE

             We're not gonna get busted.

                             KEVIN

             George, we'll wind up in a Mexican

             prison getting fucked up the ass by one

             of Maria's relatives.

                             MARIA

             Hey, fuck you, Dulli.  I'm not Mexican.

             I'm Italian.

                             BARBARA

             You're Italian?

                             KEVIN

             Yeah, right.  Gonzales.  What is that,

             Sicilian?

                             TUNA

             As far as I'm concerned, we're on

             fucking vacation.

     He grabs Maria, runs and does a huge belly-flop into the

     water.  They all laugh.

     SERIES OF SHOTS.

     George and Barbara with local musicians on the beach.

     George and Derek at a cab stand.

     George talks with a bellboy in the lobby of a local hotel.

     INT. COCOS FRIOS BAR - PUERTO VALLARTA - 1968 - DAY

     George, Barbara, Tuna, Derek, Maria, Kevin, and Rada are at

     the bar.  Ramon comes up to George, they briefly discuss and

     George follows him out of the bar.

     EXT. STREETS - PUERTO VALLARTA - 1968 - DAY

     George and Ramon climb into a beat up V.W. bug and take off.

     EXT. COUNTRYSIDE - PUERTO VALLARTA - 1968 - DAY

     Fields and Farms.  The V.W. bug pulls up to an old ranch.

     They get out of the bug and are greeted by SANTIAGO and his

     THREE SONS.

                             SANTIAGO

             Ramon tells me you are looking for some

             mota.

                             GEORGE

             Yes, I am.

     Santiago moves to a tarp and pulls it back to reveal many

     bales of green, seedless sinsemilla.

                             SANTIAGO

             For instance, something like this?

                             GEORGE

             Very nice.  I'll take it.

                             SANTIAGO

             Ha ha ha.  You are funny.   Really, how

             much will you be needing?

                             GEORGE

             All of it.  As much as you've got.  A

             couples thousand pounds.  I'll be back

             in a week with a plane.

                             SANTIAGO

             Listen, Americano, it is very nice to

             meet you, but maybe we are going too

             fast.  You take a little and then come

             back.

                             GEORGE

             I don't need a little.  I need a lot.

                             SANTIAGO

             Marijuana is illegal in my country, and

             I believe in yours, as well.  We must be

             careful.

                             GEORGE

             What if I brought you, let's say, fifty

             thousand dollars?  Would that eliminate

             some of your concerns?

                             SANTIAGO

             Amigo, you bring me fifty-thousand

             dollars, and I have no more concerns.

     EXT. SANTA MONICA AIRPORT - 1968 - DAY

     A pair of boltcutters snaps the chain off a single-engine

     Cessna.

                             TUNA

             I can't believe we're stealing a plane.

                             KEVIN

             Don't be such a pussy.

                             GEORGE

             It's fine.  We're not stealing it.

             We're borrowing it.  And try to look

             natural.  We've got company.

     A MECHANIC working on the adjacent plane is giving them the

     hairy eyeball.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Be cool.

     The three boys nod their heads in acknowledgement and give a

     small wave.  The mechanic smiles and waves back.

     INT. CESSNA - 1968 - DAY

     The engine is on and the propeller is spinning.  Kevin is at

     the controls.  Tuna is not making the trip.  He pokes his

     head in before shutting the cockpit.

                             TUNA

             You guys are fucking insane.

     George reads from a flight manual.

                             GEORGE

             Alright, pull back the throttle...

     The engine screams.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Not that far, only halfway.  You sure

             you know what you're doing?

                             KEVIN

             Relax.  I've flown with my old man a

             million times.  And he always told me,

             the taking off part is easy, it's the

             landing you've got to worry about.

     EXT. SANTIAGO FARM - MEXICO - 1968 - DAY

     The plane tries to land.  It's a clumsy one.  The Cessna is

     tipping and touching, first one wheel, then another, almost

     sideways before straightening out and stopping.  George and

     Kevin hop out of the plane.  They are greeted by Santiago and

     the Mexican contingency.

                             AMIGOS

             Hola, George!  Bienvenido!

     George hands out presents to everyone.  He's like Santa

     Claus, giving gifts to every man, woman and child.  They love

     him.  Santiago pumps George's hand.

                             SANTIAGO

             Good to see you, Jorge.  You are a man

             of your word.

                             GEORGE

             Actually, I've got some news.  That

             fifty thousand I promised you, I

             couldn't get it.

     George throws Santiago a duffel bag.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             So I brought you sixty.

     EXT. DRY LAKE BEDS - TWENTY-NINE PALMS, CA. - 1968 - DUSK

     Rada sits in the Winnebago and keeps flashing the headlights.

     Barbara, Tuna, and Maria stand on top of the Winnebago waving

     big, white towels.  The plane descends from the sky and

     touches down, making another extremely shaky landing.

     INT. FOREAL'S HOUSE - MANHATTAN BEACH - 1968 - NIGHT

     It's on the water and beautiful.  The furnishings are

     distinctly Derek Foreal.  It's a surreal scene.

     The holiday decorations are up, TOPLESS WOMEN in elf outfits

     sip champagne, and a thousand pounds of cannabis lays on the

     living room floor.

                             GEORGE

             Are you sure you want to do this in

             front of everyone?

                             DEREK

             Don't be ridiculous, these are my

             babies.

     George empties the pot all over the floor.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             George, you're a genius.  We're rich.

             Come, children.

     The girls dive on top of Derek, caressing and kissing him.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             George, get my camera.

     Derek poses with a load of marijuana like it's a new fur.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             Take a picture of me, George.  Take a

             picture of me with my new friends.

             It'll be a fabulous Christmas card.

     INT. VILLA - PUERTO VALLARATA - 1970 - DAY

     A Mexican Real Estate Agent shows Barbara and George a

     sprawling Villa in Puerto Vallarta.  It's amazing.  White

     marble on the water.  George looks at Barbara.

                             GEORGE

             Should we buy it?

                             BARBARA

             Are you kidding?

                             GEORGE

             We'll take it.

     EXT. VILLA - PUERTO VALLARATA - 1970 - MAGIC HOUR

     The team is there.  All of them.  George, Barbara, Kevin,

     Rada, Tuna, Maria and Derek with a couple of new senorita

     friends.  They all wear identical Mexican sombreros.  A

     MEXICAN BOY approaches them with a camera.

                             MEXICAN BOY

             Picture?

     They pose, their arms thrown around each other in

     camaraderie, and FLASH.  The picture freezes and WE DISSOLVE.

     INT. THE BUGGY WHIP - WEYMOUTH - 1972 - NIGHT

     George is taking Barbara and his parents out to dinner.  The

     Buggy Whip is Ermine's favorite.

                             ERMINE

             I just can't get over the size of that

             ring.  I just love it.  Fred, look at

             it.  Tell me you don't love that ring.

                             FRED

             I'm just happy that George has found

             someone he cares for.

                             ERMINE

             Yes.  Of course.  But, I'm talking about

             that ring.  It's something else.  Let me

             tell you.

                             BARBARA

             George has exquisite taste.

                             ERMINE

             What is that, two carats?  That's got to

             be two carats.

                             BARBARA

             I don't know.

                             ERMINE

             Yes.  It's at least two carats, darling.

             Treasure it.

                             FRED

             Hard to imagine being able to afford a

             ring like that on a construction salary.

     All eyes turn to George, who fumbles.

                             GEORGE

             Well, you know.  It's um...

                             ERMINE

             Oh, shut up, Fred.  Shut your big fat

             mouth.  You don't buy it all at once.

             It's called layaway.

                             FRED

             Layaway shmayaway.

                             ERMINE

             That's right.  Layaway.  Something you

             wouldn't know anything about, you

             cheapskate.

                             FRED

             Who's the cheapskate?

                             ERMINE

             You, you big old tightwad.  He still has

             his communion money.  Tell him, George.

             Tell your father about layaway.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, layaway.

                             ERMINE

             The boy is happy, Fred.  Don't be such a

             killjoy.

                             FRED

             Killjoy?

     George looks to Barbara, whose nose is bleeding.

                             GEORGE

             Honey, your nose!

                             BARBARA

             Oh my G-d, I'm so sorry.

                             ERMINE

             Barbara, here, take my napkin.

                             BARBARA

             Thanks.  I'll be okay.

                             GEORGE

             You wanna split?

                             BARBARA

             Yeah, I don't feel so well.

                             GEORGE

             Okay, guys, we're gonna leave.  Let's

             get the check.

     EXT. THE BUGGY WHIP - WEYMOUTH - 1972 - LATER

     George and Barbara exit the restaurant.

                             GEORGE

             Are you sure you're okay?  You're pale.

                             BARBARA

             I feel like shit.  Me and my frigging

             nosebleeds.

                             GEORGE

             I'm taking you to the doctor when we get

             home, and I don't want to hear any

             arguments.

                             BARBARA

             Would you be bummed out if I didn't go

             to Chicago with you?

                             GEORGE

             No, not at all.  Sure.  You're right.

             You fly home and get some rest.

                             BARBARA

             Nice first impression.  A nose bleed in

             front of your parents.

                             GEORGE

             Oh my G-d, how embarrassing were they?

             I wanted to shoot myself.

                             BARBARA

             Oh, they weren't that bad.  I mean, they

             were kind of cute.

                             GEORGE

             Promise me that we'll never be like

             them.  I don't want to wind up like

             that.

                             BARBARA

             Relax, baby.  We're going to wind up

             like us.

     INT. POLICE STATION - CHICAGO - 1972 - DAY

     SUPERIMPOSE

     MUG SHOTS of George.  Left, right, center.  George sits

     handcuffed to a chair.  Piles of marijuana bricks roll past

     him.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             I had a little problem in Chicago.

             Something about trying to sell a

             truckload of dope to an undercover

             officer.  So I applied the three rules

             of the game under if and when arrested.

     INT. COOK COUNTY COURTHOUSE - CHICAGO - 1972 - DAY

     George and his COURT APPOINTED ATTORNEY stand before the

     JUDGE at the arraignment.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             Rule one: don't fight.  A trial will

             cost you a fortune in lawyer's fees and

             the jury will chop off your balls and

             hand them to you on a platter.

                             JUDGE

             George Jung, you have been accused of

             possession of six-hundred and sixty

             pounds of marijuana with intent to

             distribute.  How do you plead?

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             Rule two: plead not guilty and get

             bailed out of jail.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Your honor, I'd like to say a few words

             to the court.

     The court appointed attorney puts his head in his hands.

                             JUDGE

             By all means.

                             GEORGE

             In all honesty, I don't feel like what

             I've done is a crime and I think it's

             illogical and irresponsible for you to

             sentence me to prison.  None of the real

             criminals of the world ever end up

             behind bars.  I mean, when you think

             about it, what did I really do?  Cross

             an imaginary line with a bunch of

             plants?  You say that I'm an outlaw, you

             say that I'm a thief, but where's the

             Christmas dinner for the people on

             relief?

     George stops when his attorney stamps on his foot.  The court

     officers roll their eyes and the judge smiles.

                             JUDGE

             Those are very interesting concepts you

             have, Mr. Jung.

             Unfortunately for you, the imaginary

             line you crossed is real, the plants you

             brought with you are illegal, and what

             you did constitutes a crime.

     The judge slams his gavel.

                             JUDGE (CONT'D)

             Bail is set at twenty-thousand dollars.

     EXT. COOK COUNTY COURTHOUSE - CHICAGO - 1972 - NIGHT

     George walks out, free on bond, to find Barbara waiting for

     him.  She doesn't look so good.

                             BARBARA

             Surprise.

                             GEORGE

             Baby, you didn't have to come.

                             BARBARA

             What, and miss all the fun?  C'mon, not

             a chance.  So, what's the verdict?

                             GEORGE

             Lawyer says he can plead it down to five

             years.  I'll serve two.

                             BARBARA

             Two years.  George, I can't wait that

             long.

                             GEORGE

             What?  You're not going to wait for me?

                             BARBARA

             George, I went to the doctor.  I don't

             have two years.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             Which brings me to rule number three:

             which says, fuck rules one and two, skip

             bail and take off.

     EXT. RENT-A-CAR - 1972 - DAY

     George hits the gas and the car screams down the road.

     EXT. VILLA - PUERTO VALLARTA - 1973 - GOLDEN HOUR

     George and Barbara sit on the veranda drinking champagne and

     watching the sun go down over the Pacific.  Barbara is

     completely bald.  Rail thin, eyes sunken.

     But it doesn't matter.  They're having a great time.  They

     laugh and hold hands and laugh some more.

     EXT. CEMETERY - PUERTO VALLARTA - 1973 - DAY

     Everyone is there.  All in black.  Barbara's casket is

     lowered into the ground and George climbs to his knees to

     push the first dirt on the grave.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             Time is such a funny thing.  I look at

             where I am now, and in here, time inches

             along.  So slow, it hardly seems like it

             moves.  But back then, time went fast.

     EXT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - NEW YORK - 1999 - DAY

     George pushes dirt along the edge of a flower root.  Still

     planting those sunflowers, he presses down firmly, standing

     before him is Barbara, still beautiful and young with flowing

     locks.  George raises his hand and makes a small wave.

     Barbara opens and closes her hand.  Bye bye.

                             GEORGE

             It went too fast.

     George looks down and Barbara is gone.  No Barbara.

     EXT. JUNG HOUSE - BACKYARD - WEYMOUTH - 1973 - NIGHT

     George hops the fence like he did when he was a boy and goes

     in the back door.

     INT. JUNG HOUSE - KITCHEN - CONTINUOUS

     Ermine looks at George blankly.

                             GEORGE

             Hi, Mom.

     Ermine just keeps looking at him.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Surprised to see me?

                             ERMINE

             Take your boots off.  You're tan.

                             GEORGE

             Mexico.

                             ERMINE

             Yeah.  We heard all about it.  I want

             you to know I'm deeply sorry about your

             girlfriend.

                             GEORGE

             Barbara.

                             ERMINE

             Yes, Barbara.  She was very pretty.

                             GEORGE

             Thank you.  Have you been getting the

             money I sent you?

                             ERMINE

             You mean the drug money?  Yes, I got it.

     Ermine's hands are trembling.  She is emotional.  She hugs

     George ferociously, not letting go.

                             ERMINE (CONT'D)

             G-d, son.

                             GEORGE

             Okay, Mom.  It's okay.  Where's Dad?

     George turns around to see Fred's beaming face.

     INT. JUNG HOUSE - KITCHEN - LATER

     George and Fred sit at the table, a bottle of Scotch sits

     between them.  The glasses are raised.

                             GEORGE

             May the wind always be at your back and

             the sun always upon your face...

                             FRED

             ...and the winds of destiny carry you

             aloft...

                             BOTH

             ...to dance with the stars.

     The glasses clink and the drinks are sucked down.

     INT. JUNG HOUSE - LATER

     The bottle is dwindling.  George and Fred are feeling it.

                             FRED

             You alright?

     George nods.

                             GEORGE

             Just low.

                             FRED

             You loved her, didn't you?  You really

             loved her.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, Dad.  I really did.  What am I

             gonna do?

                             FRED

             Tough spot.

     The glasses are refilled.

                             GEORGE

             You mad at me?

                             FRED

             Not mad.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, you are.  I can tell by the way

             you look at me.

                             FRED

             I just don't know what you're thinking.

             I don't understand your choices.  You

             know, the police are looking for you.

                             GEORGE

             I know.  I'm great at what I do, Dad.  I

             mean, I'm really great.

                             FRED

             Let me tell you something, son.  You

             would have been great at anything.

     Something outside catches George's eye.  A light.  A

     reflection.  A movement.  George is up and on the move.

                             FRED (CONT'D)

             Where are you going?

     EXT. JUNG HOUSE - NIGHT

     The front door opens and FEDERAL AGENTS pour into the house.

     INT. JUNG HOUSE - CONTINUOUS

     George is up the stairs in a flash.

                             ERMINE

             George!

     INT. GEORGE'S BEDROOM - CONTINUOUS

     George slams the door behind him, moves over to the window,

     and opens it.  Cops everywhere.  He's trapped.  Out of

     options, he folds.  He moves to the corner and sits down,

     turns on the train set.  A KNOCK on the door is heard.  FBI

     Agent, JAMES T. TROUT.

                             TROUT

             George Jung, you are under arrest.

                             FRED

             Open the door, son.

     EXT. JUNG HOUSE - LATER

     They lead George outside in handcuffs.  Ermine and Fred

     watch.

                             ERMINE

             I had no choice.

     George stops and looks at his mother, for the first time

     realizing her betrayal.

                             ERMINE (CONT'D)

             Don't look at me like that.  What was I

             supposed to do?  You're in our house.

             What, was I supposed to be an

             accomplice?

     As George is led to the police car, Ermine follows.

                             ERMINE (CONT'D)

             You don't think people know you're a

             drug dealer?  Everyone knows.  It's no

             secret.  How do you think that reflects

             on me?  Every time I go out, I'm

             humiliated.  I see the stares.  I hear

             the whispers.  How do you think that

             makes me feel?  Did you ever once stop

             and think of me?

     George's head is pushed down as he is put in the squad car.

     He looks up at his mother.

                             ERMINE (CONT'D)

             So you go to jail.  It's for your own

             good.  You need to straighten your life

             out.

     INT. DANBURY F.C.I. - 1974 - DAY

     SUPERIMPOSE:

     George is being led through a series of gated corridors.

                             GUARD

             Prisoner in.

     As he walks, he takes in the faces of the other inmates.  He

     arrives at his cell and notices he has a ROOMMATE.

                             GUARD (CONT'D)

             Prisoner in.

     The cell door opens and George steps inside.  There are books

     and papers spread out over both bunk beds.  George watches as

     his cellmate quickly clears everything off the top bunk.

     Apparently, the papers are private.  George puts his things

     down and the little man proffers his hand.  He is dark,

     polite and Colombian.

                             DIEGO DELGADO

             My name is Diego Delgado.  How do you

             do?

     INT. DANBURY F.C.I. - MESS HALL - 1974 - DAY

     George pushes his tray through the cafeteria line.  Diego is

     behind him.

                             DIEGO

             If you don't mind me asking, what is the

             reason you are in this place?

                             GEORGE

             What?

                             DIEGO

             Your offense?  Why are you here?

                             GEORGE

             I don't want to talk about it.

                             DIEGO

             Intriguing.  I see.  Would you like to

             know my crime?

                             GEORGE

             Not really, no.

                             DIEGO

             No?

                             GEORGE

             I don't like a lot of conversation,

             Diego.

                             DIEGO

             Me, too.  Too much blah, blah, blah,

             blah is no good.  But we are roommates,

             okay?  And we must talk to each other.

             I am arrested for stealing cars.  For

             the grand theft auto.  Okay?  So, now it

             is your turn.  Now you will tell me,

             okay?  You will tell me why you are

             here?

     George says nothing.  He keeps eating his food.

                             DIEGO (CONT'D)

             Oh, come on, George.  If we are to be

             friends, we must trust each other.

                             GEORGE

             Murder.

                             DIEGO

             Ah, yes.  The murder.

     INT. DANBURY F.C.I. - GEORGE'S CELL - NIGHT

     George lays on his bunk, smoking.  Diego is on the bottom

     bunk, furiously writing on a notepad.  He flips through his

     books and rustles his papers.  George peeks over the side to

     see what Diego is doing.

                             GEORGE

             What do you got there, Diego?

                             DIEGO

             Nothing.  Just a little project.

                             GEORGE

             What kind of project?

                             DIEGO

             Never mind.  Not for you to worry.

                             GEORGE

             I thought you said we were roommates.

             That we should talk about everything.

                             DIEGO

             You have your intrigues.  I have mine.

             This is a happy day for me, George.

             Nine months from today, I will be in

             Medellin sipping champagne.  In nine

             months, I am free.  How much time do you

             have?

                             GEORGE

             Twenty-six months.

                             DIEGO

             Twenty-six months?  For murder?  I must

             be your lawyer.

                             GEORGE

             I've got to get out of here, Diego.

                             DIEGO

             Only two ways I know to leave here

             early.  One is to escape.

                             GEORGE

             What's the other one?

     INT. DANBURY F.C.I. - CLASSROOM - DAY

     George is trying to teach basic education to the inmates.

     The room, mostly black and hispanic, is hostile.  They don't

     want to learn.

                             GEORGE

             Alright, let's open our books.

                             INMATE #1

             Man, fuck you.

                             INMATE #2

             We ain't opening shit.

                             INMATE #1

             You just the warden's boy.  We on to

             you.  You just trying to knock some time

             off, asskissing motherfucker.

     Diego watches as the room reacts with laughter.  This ain't

     going to be easy.

                             GEORGE

             Alright.  You're right.  I want to get

             out of this shithole as fast as I can.

             And I don't want to do this any more

             than you do.  But for me to walk early,

             some of you have to graduate.  You,

             forget about it.  You're hopeless, go to

             sleep.

     The room laughs again.

                             INMATE #3

             Damn, homeboy, you got ruined.

                             GEORGE

             But the rest of you could get diplomas

             and get jobs when you're on the outside.

     The room looks at him.  They ain't buying it.

                             INMATE #1

             Shit, I'm in for life.

                             INMATE #2

             I'm a criminal.  I ain't getting no

             motherfucking job.

                             GEORGE

             We can learn some criminal shit, too.

             Alright, I'll make you a deal.  What if

             half the time, we learn about George

             Washington, and the other half, I'll

             teach you how to smuggle drugs?

                             INMATE #2

             Man, you don't know dick about smuggling

             no drugs.

                             GEORGE

             I was arrested in Chicago with six

             hundred and sixty pounds of grass.  I

             think that qualifies me.

     Diego looks up from his desk, suddenly very interested.

                             INMATE #1

             How did you get a hold of six-hundred

             and sixty pounds of dope?

                             GEORGE

             Flew it in from Mexico on a single

             engine Cessna.  Now, do we have a deal

             or not?

     They react.  They're in.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Alright, the first thing you need to

             know about smuggling drugs is that it's

             easy.  The DEA are a bunch of losers.

             They couldn't find their dicks in a

             whorehouse.  They don't know what the

             fuck they're doing...

     Diego watches George winning over the room.  He listens

     intently to George's every word.  His wheels are turning.

     INT. DANBURY F.C.I. - GEORGE'S CELL - NIGHT

     Lights out.  Diego and George lay in their cots.  George is

     tired.  Diego is not.

                             DIEGO

             George?  Hey, George?  I listen to what

             you say to the class today about the

             smuggling.  You are a magico, ah?

     George doesn't respond.

                             DIEGO (CONT'D)

             I never believed you were a murderer.  I

             knew.  I knew you are a magico.  I have

             seen it in you.  It's in your spirit.

                             GEORGE

             I'm tired, Diego.  Go to bed.

                             DIEGO

             You like to make the boundaries

             disappear.  It's not only the money, is

             it, George?  The adventure is part of

             the victory.  It's the thrill, ah?

                             GEORGE

             Good night.

                             DIEGO

             In my country, I am a magico.  A man

             with a dream.  A man on the rise.  To

             take nothing and make it something,

             okay?  I have failed my dream, but I

             will accomplish.  That is why I am in

             your country.  Yes, I lose my freedom.

             But they do not take my dream.  Do you

             have a dream, George?

                             GEORGE

             I would if I could get some sleep.

                             DIEGO

             Yes, you have a dream.  And maybe you

             accomplish your dream.  But yet you

             failed.  Why?

                             GEORGE

             Because I got caught.

                             DIEGO

             No, my brother.

                             GEORGE

             Because they caught me?

                             DIEGO

             You failed because you had the wrong

             dream.

     Diego climbs off his bunk and looks George square in the eye.

                             DIEGO (CONT'D)

             George?  What do you know about cocaine?

     INT. DANBURY F.C.I. - MESS HALL - DAY

                             GEORGE

             I don't know, Diego.  I've got a good

             thing going already.  Everybody smokes

             pot.  It's easy.  Cocaine is a rich

             man's drug.  It's too expensive.

                             DIEGO

             No, no.  That is where you are wrong.

             For us, it is cheap.  In Medellin, we

             buy for six-thousand dollars a kilo.  IN

             Miami, we sell for sixty.

     George's interest is piqued.

                             GEORGE

             That's over fifty-thousand dollars

             profit per kilo.

                             DIEGO

             And that's wholesale.  Cut it a few

             times and retail, you're looking at two,

             three-hundred thousand.

                             GEORGE

             Oh my G-d.

                             DIEGO

             Yes.  And a kilo of coca is smaller than

             a kilo of your precious marijuana.

             Everything is the same, George, except

             instead of thousands, you are making

             millions.

                             GEORGE

             Jesus Christ.  Jesus fucking Christ.

                             DIEGO

             Now do you see what I am saying?

                             GEORGE

             Getting it here is no problem.  Trust

             me.  I'll fly it in myself if I have to.

             What about supply?  How much can we get?

                             DIEGO

             Don't worry.  We will talk of

             everything.  We have the time.  You

             arrive here with a Bachelor of

             Marijuana, but you will leave with a

             Doctorate of Cocaine.

     INT. DANBURY F.C.I. - GEORGE'S CELL - NIGHT

     Diego and George pouring over Diego's plans.  Discussing,

     planning, plotting.

                             DIEGO

             What type of planes do you have?

                             GEORGE

             Four passenger, single engine Cessna.

                             DIEGO

             How many kilos can we fit in these

             planes?

                             GEORGE

             I don't know.  A hundred, hundred and

             fifty.  How many miles is it from

             Colombia to Miami?

                             DIEGO

             Fifteen hundred.  We'll have to stop

             somewhere to refuel.

                             GEORGE

             We'll refuel in the Bahamas.  I know

             someone there.

                             DIEGO

             Great.  I love the Bahamas.

     EXT. LIQUOR STORE - WEYMOUTH - 1976

     SUPERIMPOSE: JULY, 1976.

     George is at a payphone.  He drops in about a million

     quarters until he is finally connected.

                             GEORGE

             Diego Delgado, please?

                             DIEGO

             Allo?

                             GEORGE

             Diego?  It's George.

                             DIEGO

             George, hallo!  Today is the day, ah?

             Are you out?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, I'm out.

                             DIEGO

             Congratulations, brother.  I've been

             waiting for you.

                             GEORGE

             How are we doing?

                             DIEGO

             Perfect, George.  Perfect.  Everything

             is fine down here.  Everything is all

             set up.

                             GEORGE

             Do we need a plane?  How does this work?

             When do I see you?

                             DIEGO

             Slow down, George.  Slow down.

     Fred exits the liquor store carrying two bottles of Dom

     Perignon.  As he catches George's eye, he lifts the bottles

     showing them off.  George holds up his finger, indicating

     he'll be just a second.

                             DIEGO (CONT'D)

             You need to come down here, everybody

             meets everybody.  Ho ho ho.  Ha ha ha.

             We do one for good faith and then we

             talk about airplanes.

                             GEORGE

             I can't go anywhere, Diego.  I'm on

             parole.  I can't leave the state.

                             DIEGO

             But you must.  It's the only way.

                             GEORGE

             I just got released five minutes ago.

                             DIEGO

             George, are we gonna do this or not?

     EXT. BASSETERRE HOTEL - ANTIGUA - POOLSIDE - 1976 - DAY

     George steps outside and spots Diego.  Their eyes meet.

     Diego looks different, relaxed.  He wears a straw hat,

     shorts, and sports a healthy tan.  The two men embrace.

                             GEORGE

             Good to see you, Diego.

                             DIEGO

             Yes.  Look around you.  The sun.  The

             water.  The women.  It's better than

             Danbury, no?  Come on.  I have some

             friends I would like you to meet.

     EXT. BASSETERRE HOTEL - ANTIGUA - POOLSIDE - 1976 - DAY

     Diego and George sit with five other Colombians, most

     notably, a man named CESAR ROZA.  The mood is not friendly.

                             DIEGO

             Fifteen kilos.  Seven and a half in each

             suitcase.  You receive a hundred

             thousand dollars upon delivery.

                             GEORGE

             Okay.

                             CESAR

             Not so fast.  I would like to go over

             the details.

                             GEORGE

             What details?  I put the coke in the

             false bottoms and take it through

             customs.

                             CESAR

             Tell me about the suitcases.  What is

             the make and the color?

                             DIEGO

             Samsonites.  Red.  No tags.

     Cesar thinks about it.

                             CESAR

             Hmm.  I see.  Will there be clothes in

             the suitcase?

                             GEORGE

             What?  Yeah, sure.

                             CESAR

             Whose cloths?  Your clothes?

                             GEORGE

             My clothes, your clothes.  What does it

             matter?

                             CESAR

             I would like to know the contents.

             Every detail is important.

                             GEORGE

             What are we doing here, Diego?  This

             guy's a clown.  He's talking about

             clothes.

                             CESAR

             I demand to know everything.  I do not

             trust six-hundred thousand dollars of

             coca to someone I don't know.

                             GEORGE

             It's a lousy fifteen kilos.  I piss

             fifteen kilos.

                             CESAR

             The coca is my responsibility!

                             GEORGE

             You're a fucking amateur!

                             DIEGO

             Gentlemen, please.  There is no need to

             be impolite.  Cesar, this will be fine.

             You have my word.  George, Cesar is just

             being thorough.  That's all.

                             CESAR

             Very well.  But just remember, Mr. Jung.

             I will be with you the whole way.  And I

             will be watching.

     INT. LOGAN AIRPORT - CUSTOMS - 1976 - DAY

     George carries the two Samsonites over to customs

     inspections.  It's a long walk.  George's heart beats hard.

     The sound is audible and grows with every beat.  BA-BUMP.  BA

     BUMP.  Cesar lurks at the baggage carousel.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             When you're carrying drugs across the

             border, the idea is to remain calm.  The

             way I do it is to think of something

             pleasant, a fun party, a moment of

             triumph.  A sexual encounter.  I

             actually project myself to that place.

             Anything to keep your mind off the fact

             that you're going to jail for a very

             long time if they find the fifteen kilos

             of cocaine in your suitcases.

     George stands in front of the customs agent.  He tries his

     best to look relaxed as the agent reviews his documents.

                             CUSTOMS AGENT

             On vacation?

                             GEORGE

             Yes.

                             CUSTOMS AGENT

             On vacation for only one day?

     BA-BUMP.  BA-BUMP.  The heartbeats are very loud.

                             GEORGE

                 (weak smile)

             My brother's wedding.  Imagine that,

             huh?

     George's breathing is labored and his swallowing reflex

     doesn't seem to be working.  Cesar passes through, eyeballing

     George the whole time.

                             CUSTOMS AGENT

             Open your bags, please.

     George opens the Samsonites.  Super dry mouth.  BA-BUMP.  BA

     BUMP.  The beats are deafening now.  Cesar nervously monitors

     the situation from the payphones.

                             CUSTOMS AGENT (CONT'D)

             Whose clothes are these?

                             GEORGE

             Mine.

     The customs agent holds up a woman's undergarment.  Cesar

     throws up his hands in frustration.

                             CUSTOMS AGENT

             And this?

                             GEORGE

             What can I tell you?  Different strokes.

     George winks at the customs agent, who shakes his head before

     finishing the inspection.

                             CUSTOMS AGENT

             Alright, go ahead.

     EXT. LOGAN AIRPORT - PAYPHONES - CONTINUOUS

     George moves to the payphones, sets down the two suitcases,

     and pretends to make a call.  Not inconspicuously, Cesar

     grabs the bags and walks quickly out of the terminal.

     INT. BASSETERRE HOTEL - ANTIGUA - 1976 - DAY

     Diego, Cesar, George and JACK STEVENS, a silver haired

     executive type, lounge around the mini-suite.  Cesar still

     has that crazy look in his eye.

                             DIEGO

             Three-hundred kilos it is, then.

     A beautiful Latin woman enters and kisses both Diego and

     Cesar.  Her name is INEZ, and friendly she is not.

                             DIEGO (CONT'D)

             Has everyone met Inez?  This is George.

             I've told you about him.  And this is

             friend, Jack Stevens.

     The men proffer their hands, but she just looks at them like

     ants before sitting down next to Diego.

                             DIEGO (CONT'D)

             Try to be more respectful, darling.  My

             apologies.  But she is mistrustful of

             Americans.  Shall we proceed?  Let's

             hear it again, Mr. Stevens.

                             STEVENS

             I'll fly down on a Friday, refuel in the

             Bahamas, and then to Medellin.

                             INEZ

             Friday?

     Inez addresses Diego and Cesar only.  She speaks in Spanish.

     The conversation is about "Why Friday?"  Inez has some

     problem with it.  Diego explains.  And Inez is reassured.

                             DIEGO

             Please, continue.

                             GEORGE

             We make the pick-up, refuel once more in

             the Bahamas, and fly back on Sunday with

             the mom and pop traffic.

                             CESAR

             Why are you speaking?

                             GEORGE

             Excuse me?

                             CESAR

             You.  Your responsibility is over.  You

             do not fly.  You are not a pilot.  You

             are not a distributor.  You introduced

             us to Mr. Stevens and the use of his

             airplane.  That is all.  You make a

             percentage.  A generous one.  And you're

             lucky to get that.

                             GEORGE

             I see.  How much?

                             CESAR

             Padrino will pay ten-thousand per kilo.

             For everyone.  For you, and you, and

             you.

     He indicates George, Diego and Jack Stevens.

                             CESAR (CONT'D)

             There is no negotiation.  Three-million

             dollars.  That is all.

                             STEVENS

             I want two.

                             GEORGE

             Gee, Jack, a million each had such a

             nice ring to it.

                             STEVENS

             No way.  I'm doing all the work.  Taking

             all the risk, and it's my plane.

     Diego and George look at each other.

                             STEVENS (CONT'D)

             Hey, you guys don't have to do shit.

             Just sit back and collect your money.

                             GEORGE

             You good with this?

     Diego nods.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Alright.

     This is too much for Inez to handle.  She starts screaming

     machine gun Spanish.  Something about a "lousy two-hundred

     and fifty-thousand dollars," and how Diego is "such a coward"

     to give away all his money.  Diego is embarrassed but tries

     to remain calm.

                             DIEGO

             You will watch what you say.  Especially

             around George.  He is my brother and he

             speaks as good Spanish as you.

     But Inez is wild.  She starts in again, a log of "Putos

     (SOB's)", and "Cojones" and "Maricones (gay/sissys)."  Even

     Cesar is uncomfortable.  Diego stands.

                             DIEGO (CONT'D)

             Okay.  That's enough.

                             INEZ

             Get your hands off me.

     Inez takes a swing at Diego and catches him full across the

     face.  Time stops in the room.  Question.  What will Diego

     do?  Answer: SMACK!  Diego swings back and a full scale is

     on.  Cesar continues the conversation.  It's surreal.  As if

     Diego and Inez weren't beating the shit out of each other

     right in front of them.

                             CESAR

             Do you have pictures of your kids?

                             STEVENS

             What?

                             CESAR

             I'll need to see them.  Also need their

             names and the names of their schools.

             We are trusting you with ninety million

             dollars worth of coca, Mr. Stevens.

             Without your children, there is no deal.

     Stevens thinks about it.  Kids as collateral.  Inez and Diego

     are still duking it out.  But Diego finally gets the upper

     hand and drags her into the bedroom.

                             STEVENS

             Fine.  So if that's all, I'll be leaving

             now.

     Cesar walks him to the door.

                             CESAR

             Don't forget the pictures.

     Diego calls from the other room.

                             DIEGO (O.S.)

             George.  George, come in here.

     INT. LA BELLE MER - BEDROOM - LATER

     Diego has put Inez in the bathroom and is holding the door

     closed.  She pounds and kicks and screams in frustration, but

     he pays no attention.

                             DIEGO

             What's the matter, George?

                             GEORGE

             What's the matter?  We're moving three

             hundred fucking kilos and we're making

             dogshit.

                             DIEGO

             A million dollars for our first run is

             not bad, George.

                             GEORGE

             It is bad.  It's chump change.  We might

             as well be hauling suitcases across the

             border.  We're getting screwed.

                             DIEGO

             I know.

                             GEORGE

             And what happens when these guys stop

             paying?  Sooner or later, these guys are

             going to cut us out.  Then where are we?

                             DIEGO

             That's my George, always thinking.

     The door is yanked open to reveal Inez.  She is in a rage.

     Diego slams it in her face.

                             DIEGO (CONT'D)

             This is only part of the business,

             George.  A very small part.  Don't

             worry, there is so much more to do.

             Which reminds me, I need a favor from

             you.  I must go to Colombia.

                             GEORGE

             What is it, George?  Because I have to

             get home.  I've got a parole officer

             waiting for me.

                             DIEGO

             I need you to go to Miami.

     EXT. VENETIAN KING APTS. - MIAMI - 1977 - DAY

     George gets out of a taxi to find SEVERAL COLOMBIAN MEN

     hanging around outside an apartment.  He checks the address

     and moves over to the men.

                             GEORGE

             I'm George.  Friend of Diego's?

     The Colombian men are not impressed.  They grab George and

     pull him inside.

     INT. VENETIAN KING APTS. - CONTINUOUS

     George is pinned against the wall and the Colombian men all

     start screaming at him in Spanish.  There seems to be a

     problem.  A man, ALESSANDRO, steps forward.  He is the one

     who speaks English.

                             ALESSANDRO

             QUIET!  Callate!  Where's Diego?

                             GEORGE

             I don't know.  He sent me.  I'm George.

                             ALESSANDRO

             Oh, I see.  George.  Well, that explains

             everything.  Open your mouth, George.

     George's puzzled look is replaced by a gun barrel in his

     face.  Alessandro presses it against George's front teeth.

                             ALESSANDRO (CONT'D)

             Now, you listen to me.  Are you hearing

             me?

     George nods.

                             ALESSANDRO (CONT'D)

             You see this?

     He indicates two duffel bags stuffed with fifty kilos of

     cocaine.

                             ALESSANDRO (CONT'D)

             I've been holding this shit for him for

             three weeks.  You tell Diego I don't

             appreciate it.  You tell him I want my

             money by Friday.  Can you do that?

                             GEORGE

             Um-hmm.

     INT. JUNG HOUSE - GEORGE'S ROOM - DAY

     George sits on his bed, reading.  Two duffel bags are tucked

     away in the closet.  Ermine pokes her head in.

                             ERMINE

             You have a phone call.

     George picks up the phone.

                             DIEGO (O.S.)

             George.

                             GEORGE

             Jesus Christ, Diego, where are you?

             It's been eleven days and these guys

             want their fucking money.

                             DIEGO (O.S.)

             Bad news, George.  I'm in Colombia.

                             GEORGE

             Well, you better get here fast.  I'm

             sitting on...

     George notices Ermine is loitering in the hallway,

     eavesdropping.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Hi, Mom.

     George acknowledges her before shutting the door in her face.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             I'm sitting on fifty fucking keys.  Get

             your ass up here.

     INT. CARCEL DE VARONES - MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA - CONTINUOUS

     It's a South American prison.  Diego is on the pay phone.

                             DIEGO

             It's a little hard to get away right

             now.  I'm afraid you're on your own.

     INT. FOREAL'S HOUSE - MANHATTAN BEACH - 1977 - NIGHT

     George and Derek sit in the living room with MR. T, a hippie

     ish looking professor.  On the table sits various

     paraphernalia.  Scales, beakers, test tubes, and a hot box.

     George and Derek watch as Mr. T scoops some of George's

     cocaine and sets it onto the two-inch metal plate.

                             MR. T

             What we're doing is measuring the

             purity.  Pure coke melts out a hundred

             and eighty-five, a hundred and ninety

             degrees.  Cutting agents melt much

             lower.  About a hundred degrees.

             Quality product starts melting at a

             hundred and forty degrees.  That's what

             I'm hoping for.

     Mr. T turns the dial.  120.  130.  140.

                             MR. T (CONT'D)

             Good.

     150.  160.

                             MR. T (CONT'D)

             Jesus Christ.

     170.  180.

                             MR. T (CONT'D)

             Holy fucking Mary!  Jesus, fuck me

             running!  Where did you get this shit!

     At one-hundred and eighty-seven degrees, the white powder

     dribbles off the hotplate and melts away.

                             MR. T (CONT'D)

             Damn!  Can I do a fucking line?!

     Mr. T puts his nose in the powder.  George pulls Foreal

     aside.

                             GEORGE

             What did I tell you?

                             DEREK

             It's great and everything, but what am I

             going to do with all this?

                             GEORGE

             Sell it?

                             DIEGO

             Jesus Christ, George, I don't see you in

             two years, and you show up at my door

             with a hundred and ten pounds of

             cocaine?

                             GEORGE

             Just sell it, Derek.

                             DEREK

             Alright, but it's gonna take me a year.

     INT. THE WHIPPING POST - MANHATTAN BEACH - 1977 - NIGHT

     Money everywhere.  All over the floor, the counters, the

     chairs, and even in the sinks.  George and Derek count the

     money patiently, writing the dollar amount in yellow high

     lighter on the top of each stack, before wrapping it with a

     rubber band.

                             DIEGO

             Thirty-six hours.  I can't believe it.

             Everything is gone in thirty-six hours.

                             GEORGE

             I think it's fair to say you

             underestimated the market there, Derek.

                             DIEGO

             Touche.

                             GEORGE

             But to the victor belong the spoils.

     George divides the money.  There's a hell of a lot.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Half a million for you.  Half a million

             for me.  One-point-three five for the

             Colombians.

                             DEREK

             Nice doing business with you, George.

                             GEORGE

             Not bad for a weekend's work, huh?

     INT. AIRPORT - MIAMI - DAY

     Immaculate in his white turtleneck and sunglasses, George

     walks with two aluminum cases.  He is greeted by Alessandro

     and his thugs.

                             ALESSANDRO

             Greetings, Mr. George.

                             GEORGE

             Where do you guys want to count?

                             ALESSANDRO

             On the plane.

                             GEORGE

             What plane?  We going someplace?  Where

             we headed?  You have your money.  It's

             all there.  What the fuck is going on?

     They usher him away.

     EXT. OLAYA HERRERA AIRPORT - MEDELLIN - DAY

     SUPERIMPOSE: MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA

     The lear jet lands.

     EXT. DESERTED SUGAR FACTORY - LOS RIOS, COLOMBIA - DAY

     The blazer pulls into a long driveway.  They approach a gate

     where SHIRTLESS TEENAGERS with MAC-10's stand guard.  The

     gate opens.  YOUNG SOLDIERS open the door for George and

     roughly usher him over to a Jeep within the confine.  They

     frisk him top to bottom.  Diego is leaning against another

     Jeep and waits for George to be released.

                             DIEGO

             George, good to see you, my brother.

                             GEORGE

             What the fuck is going on?  When did you

             get out of jail?

                             DIEGO

             Pablo used his influence.  Now, George,

             watch what you say.  Everybody hears

             everything.  A lot of things get said

             and done that, well, let's just say this

             isn't America.  Life is cheap here, you

             know?  No offense, but you know what I'm

             saying?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.  Keep my mouth shut and let you do

             the talking.

                             DIEGO

             Right.  Now who is the person in

             California?  The connection?

                             GEORGE

             Just a friend.

                             DIEGO

             Who?  I need to know.  Ah, never mind.

             We'll talk about it later.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.  You do the talking.

     The sound of a young man, a MALETON, struggling can be heard

     in the distance.  From another area, PABLO ESCOBAR emerges.

     He is singular in purpose.  He is handed a pistol and moves

     quickly over to the man and quietly speaks a few words.  And

     then, without emotion, he shoots the maleton in the head.

     George and Diego, who is visibly shaken, watch.  Escobar is

     handed a towel, and he wipes the splattered blood off his

     hands, as he moves back.

                             LARGE COLOMBIAN MAN

             He will see you now.

                 (to Diego)

             Not you.

                             DIEGO

             There must be some kind of mistake.

                             LARGE COLOMBIAN MAN

             No mistake.  Mr. Escobar will see Mr.

             Jung alone.  You are to wait here.

     George hesitates.

                             DIEGO

             It's alright, George.  You go.

                             LARGE COLOMBIAN MAN

             This way, please.

     The large Colombian man escorts George towards the area where

     the maleton was just shot.  George looks back at Diego as he

     is led away.

                             ESCOBAR

             So, this is the man who takes fifty

             kilos and makes them disappear in one

             day?

                             GEORGE

             Actually, it was three.

                             ESCOBAR

             The man who gives us the airplanes.  The

             man from America.  The mafia.  Chicago.

             Boom boom.  Hollywood.  You are going to

             open for us the gates of Hollywood,

             George?

                             GEORGE

             It would be my pleasure.

                             ESCOBAR

             Good.  Very good.  Welcome, my friend.

             Welcome to my country.

     Escobar moves over to embrace George.  George returns it, and

     their hands come together.  George can't help it.  He

     reflexively looks at his hands.  Escobar understands.

                             ESCOBAR (CONT'D)

             The man in the garden.  He was full of

             courage.

                             GEORGE

             Un sapo?

                             ESCOBAR

             Un rata - no good.  But he could have

             run, fled the country.  Gone to the

             policia.  But then his wife, his

             children, his parents, his friends, many

             people would die.

                             GEORGE

             Yes.

                             ESCOBAR

             But, never mind.  I am thinking we can

             do much together.  This problem with

             Diego, the stolen car, the jail, is very

             silly business.  To release him from the

             carcel, it causes me much inconvenience.

             The fifty kilos could have been a big

             problem.  And I don't like problems.

                             GEORGE

             With all respect, Padrino.  Diego is my

             partner.  I do not do business without

             him.

     Escobar looks at him with a cold stare.  But George doesn't

     flinch.  His face reveals nothing.  Finally, a smile breaks

     across Pablo's lips.

                             ESCOBAR

             I like you, George.  You are loyal.

             That is good.  That is rare.  Maybe

             crazy.  Yes.  I can tell already.  You

             are like me.  I look at you and I see

             myself.  It's in the eyes, no, George?

                             GEORGE

             Yes, it is.

                             ESCOBAR

             So, you are wanting to sell the cocaine

             for me in your country, George?

                             GEORGE

             Yes, sir.  As much as you can give me.

                             ESCOBAR

             As much as I can give you?  Ha ha.  Very

             good.  I like that.  Come, George.  Let

             us drive.  We have much to talk about.

     Diego watches the two men walk outside.  Escobar throws an

     arm around George's shoulder.  Pablo hops into a Jeep and

     motions for George.  The bodyguards come running.  But Pablo

     waves them away.

     EXT. MOUNTAINSIDE - COLOMBIA - DAY

     Escobar pulls the Jeep off the road and parks it.  Before

     them is a stunning panorama.

                             ESCOBAR

             I like to come up here.  To make the

             decisions.  To be one with nature.

                             GEORGE

             It's beautiful.

                             ESCOBAR

             People tell me that I am crazy.  That my

             business will never work in your

             country.  What do you think, George?

     Escobar looks out over the vista, allowing George the time to

     respond in full.

                             GEORGE

             What do I think?  I don't want my answer

             to be influenced by what I want, so I'm

             going to have to say I don't know.

                             ESCOBAR

             Yes.  I do not know, either.  What do

             you want, George?

                             GEORGE

             I want money.

                             ESCOBAR

             Yes.  Money.  Which is what, George?

                             GEORGE

             Freedom.

                             ESCOBAR

             Power?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, maybe.

                             ESCOBAR

             Family.

                             GEORGE

             Sure.

                             ESCOBAR

             Beautiful girls?

                             GEORGE

             Keep them coming.

                             ESCOBAR

             Keep them coming?  Ah, yes.  Ha ha.  You

             are right.  But money.

                             GEORGE

             Money.

                             ESCOBAR

             And Diego?

                             GEORGE

             Diego is my brother.

     Escobar looks at George a long time.  He's inscrutable.

                             ESCOBAR

             Good.  Take care of him, George.  I'm

             fond of him, but he is sometimes like a

             baby.  Keep an eye on him, okay?

     EXT. DESERTED SUGAR FACTORY - ENTRANCE - DAY

     Diego is a little pissed off for being left for so long.  He

     taps his foot and picks at his fingernails.  Escobar and

     George pull up in the Jeep.  Diego leaps to his feet.

                             DIEGO

             Padrino.

     Escobar wraps his arms around Diego in an embrace.

                             ESCOBAR

             Diego, mijo.  I've made a decision.  We

             are going into business and I would like

             to start right away.

     MONTAGE - GEORGE AND DIEGO TAKING OVER THE WORLD

     The following images are overlaid with snow falling and money

     dropping through frame.  CLOSE SHOTS of George and Diego on

     the phone, wheeling and dealing, hands counting cash, and

     lines being drawn off mirrors.  The effect is surreal and

     dreamy.

     INT. WAREHOUSE - DAY

     A duffel bag is unzipped, revealing bricks and bricks of

     cocaine.  Each marked with a "P."  A knife punctures one of

     the bricks.  A mound of white powder is brought up to a man's

     nose.  It's George who samples, and then it is sampled by the

     man he is doing business with.  The shot widens TO REVEAL all

     the participants and dozens and dozens of duffel bags.  A

     handshake seals the deal.

     STILL PHOTOS

     Handshake after handshake after handshake.

     INT. MIAMI HOUSE - NIGHT

     George and Diego counting cash.  It's everywhere.  All over

     the floor, in two-foot stacks.

     MORE STILL PHOTOS

     Various transactions completed.

     INT. MIAMI HOUSE - NIGHT

     George and Diego count.  It's ridiculous how much money there

     is.  The stacks are now waist high and spill into other

     rooms.  Inez is there, pacing the floor and rapid-fire

     talking on the phone.

     MORE STILL PHOTOS

     George and Diego, the Banditos.  Cigars.  Champagne.  Arms

     around each other in camaraderie.  In Diego's yellow Ferrari.

     With Inez, sunning on a yacht.  More coke and more

     transactions.  When the deals are with Derek Foreal, Diego is

     always notably absent.

     INT. MIAMI HOUSE - NIGHT

     The money is so high, it almost reaches the ceiling.  There

     is nowhere to put it.  George and Diego sit at the coffee

     table, dwarfed by the stacks of bills.  There is a

     discrepancy in the count.

                             GEORGE

             Three million.  I counted it twice.

                             DIEGO

             It's two-point-five, George.  I am sure.

     George starts to pick up the money.

                             GEORGE

             I'm calling it three.

                             DIEGO

             We're half a million off.

                             GEORGE

             Fuck it.  I'm not counting it again.

                             DIEGO

             Weight it.  If it's sixty pounds, it's

             three.  If it's fifty, it's two-point

             five.

                             GEORGE

             I don't give a shit.  Close enough.

     George moves down the hall looking for a place to stack the

     money, but there is no more room.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Where do I put this!?

                             DIEGO

             Try the back bedroom.

     George opens the back bedroom door to find wall-to-wall

     money.  It's packed.

                             GEORGE

             There's no room.

                             DIEGO

             Try the closet.

     No luck there, either.  George drops the money on the floor

     and moves back into the living room.

                             GEORGE

             We've got to do something about this.

     INT. BANCO DE FEDERALE - PANAMA CITY - DAY

     SUPERIMPOSE: PANAMA CITY, PANAMA

     George and Diego watch as their money is hauled into a huge

     wall safe.  Armed Panamanian soldiers stand guard.  The

     Panamanian officials and the BANK PRESIDENT oversee the

     proceedings.

                             GEORGE

             Are you comfortable with this?

                             DIEGO

             George, we've got sixty-one million

             dollars.  It's either here or someplace

             else.  We've got to put it somewhere.

             Unless you want to launder it.

                             GEORGE

             And keep only forty-percent?  No thanks.

                             DIEGO

             Then relax.  It's a federal bank.

             Guaranteed by the government.  And Senor

             Noriega has very lenient banking

             principles.  No questions.  No problems.

             All the pesados keep their money here.

             Even El Padrino.  What do you worry?

             Everyone knows we are with Escobar.  Who

             is going to fuck with us?

     INT. BANCO DE FEDERALE - PRESIDENT'S OFFICE - DAY

     George and Diego sign papers.  The bank president

     congratulates them and hands them documentation.

                             GEORGE

             I love it.

                             BANK PRESIDENT

             I'm sorry.

                             GEORGE

             I give you thirty-million dollars and

             you give me this little book.

     MORE STILL PHOTOS

     Diego and Inez's wedding.  The ceremony.  The ring.  The

     kiss.  The lineup with all of the bridesmaids.  George is the

     best man, and the only American.

     INT. BILTMORE HOTEL - BALLROOM - NIGHT

     A huge reception.  All the pomp and circumstance Colombian

     money can buy.  Politicians.  Policemen.  And every smuggler

     north of Colombia.  George sits with Diego and Inez at the

     table of honor.  Inez is opening presents.  Diego's tipsiness

     is a little out of character, but hey, it's his wedding day

     and a little champagne never hurt anyone.  He drunkenly

     throws his arm around George's shoulder.

                             DIEGO

             I'm married, George.  Me.  I can't

             believe it.  Can you believe I'm

             married, George?

                             GEORGE

             You're a lucky man, Diego.

                             DIEGO

             I love you, my brother, do you know

             that?

                             GEORGE

             I love you too, man.

     George notices MIRTHA showing teeth across the room.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             I'll be right back, Diego.

                             INEZ

             Look, honey, a power boat.

                             DIEGO

             Great, baby, great!

     They kiss.  George walks across the dance floor directly

     towards Mirtha.

                             GEORGE

             Hello.

                             MIRTHA

             Hello.

                             GEORGE

             Do I know you?

                             MIRTHA

             I don't think so.

                             GEORGE

             Why are you smiling?

                             MIRTHA

             Why are you smiling?

                             GEORGE

             I don't know.  My name is George.

                             MIRTHA

             I know who you are, El Americano.

             Mister George.

                             GEORGE

             What is your name?

     Cesar arrives.

                             CESAR

             Mr. Jung, I see you've met my fiancee,

             Mirtha.

     He kisses her.

                             GEORGE

             Mirtha.

                             CESAR

             Diego needs to see you right away,

             please.  Excuse us, Amorcito.

     They leave.  George looks back, Mirtha is giving him more

     teeth.  George arrives at the table.  Various greetings.

                             AUGUSTO

             Pleased to meet you finally, George.  I

             am Augusto Oliveras.

                             GEORGE

             My pleasure, Augusto.  Diego has told me

             much about you.

                             RAMON OCHOA

             Congratulations on your conquest of the

             West Coast.   How much bigger can we

             get?

                             GEORGE

             Sky's the limit.  We're just beginning

             to tap the market.  If it's accepted by

             actors and musicians, the rest will

             follow.

     They all agree.  Mirtha still gives George the teeth from

     across the room.  Diego returns to the table.

                             AUGUSTO

             We are talking about George's West Coast

             operation.

                             DIEGO

             Ah, George's mystery man.

                             RAFAEL OJEDA

             Yes, where is this man?  When do we meet

             him?

                             DIEGO

             You don't meet him.  George keeps this a

             secret.  He's here meeting everyone,

             goes to Colombia and meets Pablo, but

             still keeps his secrets.  Even from his

             brother.

                             JUAN CARLOS "THE GUAPO"

             Come on, George, we're all in this

             together.

                             EMILIO OCHOA

             Yes, George, there's enough for

             everybody.

                             GEORGE

             I think Padroni is happy with the

             current situation.  Will you please

             excuse me?

     George exits after Mirtha.

     INT. BILTMORE HOTEL - BALLROOM - CONTINUOUS

     George steps into the empty lobby looking for Mirtha.  He

     can't find her.  She appears from the shadows and startles

     him.  George embraces her and plants one on her.

                             MIRTHA

             You better know what you're doing,

             George.  You're playing with fire.

                             GEORGE

             I like fire.

     MONTAGE - MUSIC CUE - LIVING THE GOOD LIFE

     CLOSE UP - George does a huge line, left to right.

     CLOSE UP - Mirtha does a huge line, right to left.

     EXT. MIAMI DRAG - DAY

     A stretch limo flies by, left to right.  The windows are open

     and Mirtha and George whoop it up as they go by.

     INT. MIAMI NIGHTCLUB - NIGHT

     George and Mirtha out on the crowded dance floor, grooving to

     the Salsa rhythms.

     STILL PHOTOS

     Champagne bottles in hand, George and Mirtha on the tarmac

     running from the limo to the waiting private plane.

     EXT. FIVE STAR HOTEL - LOS ANGELES - DAY

     George and Mirtha poolside, wearing shades, getting some sun.

     She blows him a kiss from the adjoining lounge chair.  He

     blows one back.  She licks her lips and it's on.  He's out of

     the chair, pouring champagne over her tan body, and licking

     it off.  She squeals with delight.

     A table gets knocked over as they cause a commotion.  A hotel

     manager comes over, but George hands him a wad of cash and he

     quickly fucks off.

     INT. MIAMI NIGHTCLUB - NIGHT - MAGICAL REALITY

     The dancing is in SUPER SLOW MOTION now.  Passionate, carnal,

     intimate.

     STILL PHOTOS

     George buys gifts for Mirtha and she shows them off for the

     camera.  A fur.  A ring.  A house.

     INT. EASTHAM HOUSE - DAY

     Overhead shot of George and Mirtha's bedroom.  It's

     completely covered with money.  Completely covered.  George

     and Mirtha make love on the sea of cash.  As CAMERA PULLS UP

     we see money slowly falling from the ceiling.

     INT. SILVER STAR WEDDING CHAPEL - LAS VEGAS - 1978 - DAY

     There is no white dress.  There is no tuxedo.  George and

     Mirtha haven't even taken off their sunglasses.

                             MIRTHA

             I do.

     They kiss.  Mirtha wipes her red nose.

                             MIRTHA (CONT'D)

             I need a fucking drink.

     INT. EASTHAM HOUSE - CONTINUOUS

     George moves to the bedroom.  Mirtha is pregnant and she's

     showing.  She's also bent over a mirror with a straw in her

     hand.  George opens the door and takes her by surprise.

                             GEORGE

             Jesus Christ.

                             MIRTHA

             Oh, don't be such a fucking hypocrite.

             I quit smoking, didn't I?

                             GEORGE

             Put that shit away, they're here.

     INT. EASTHAM HOUSE - DOWNSTAIRS - LATER

     Mirtha and George lead Fred and Ermine from room to room,

     showing off the house.  The decor is, well, eclectic.  It

     doesn't match the architecture.

                             ERMINE

             It's all so beautiful.

                             MIRTHA

             What do you think, Dad?

                             FRED

             Yeah.  Nice.

                             ERMINE

             Look at this credenza.  If you don't

             mind me asking, how much is something

             like that?  It's got to cost a fortune.

                             GEORGE

                 (quickly)

             It's a family heirloom.

                             ERMINE

             I've seen those in magazines.  They're

             not cheap.

                             GEORGE

             Mirtha comes from a very wealthy family.

                             ERMINE

             Oh, I see.

                             MIRTHA

             Come on.  I'll show you the rest of the

             house.

     George and his father move outside.

     EXT. GROUNDS - CONTINUOUS

     George and his father walk.

                             GEORGE

             So, business is going good.  I've got

             this import/export thing going on in

             Miami that's been very profitable.  With

             my investments...

                             FRED

             Don't bullshit me, George.  I don't see

             you very much, I don't want to waste the

             time.

     They move along the rear of the house.  Classic cars line the

     driveway.

                             FRED (CONT'D)

             You come from my body, remember?  You're

             my baby boy.  The same kid who would

             jump off a mountain if someone told him

             he couldn't do it.  You haven't changed

             much.  I know the things you do.  Not

             everything.  But I get the picture and I

             don't care.  I don't like it.  It's not

             what I would have chosen for you, but

             it's your life.  It doesn't have

             anything to do with me.

     He turns and looks at his boy.

                             FRED (CONT'D)

             You're like your mother.  You love

             money.

                             GEORGE

             Dad.

                             FRED

             No, it's good.  You have a family.  It's

             good if it makes you happy.  It's nice

             to have nice things.  Are you happy,

             son?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, Dad.  I'm happy right now.

     INT. HOLIDAY MOTEL - LITTLE HAVANA - 1978 - DAY

     Diego puts a straw in his nose and snorts a big gakker.  His

     eyes are wide, his pupils dilated, and a weapon sticks out of

     the back of his pants.  He knocks the dust off his nose

     before moving outside.  George is on the porch, smoking a

     cigarette.

                             DIEGO

             Three years.  How long have we been in

             business?  Three years.  Does she get to

             meet your connection?  Was she good

             enough?

                             GEORGE

             Shut up, Diego.  They're going to be

             here any minute.  I'm trying to

             concentrate.

                             DIEGO

             I'm very angry with you, George.  Very

             angry.  You don't take me to California,

             but you take your bitch wife?  A woman?

             I understand you love her, but it was

             you and me who started this.  You and

             me.

                             GEORGE

             What do you need my connection for,

             Diego?  What are you going to do with

             it?

                             DIEGO

             What do I do with it?  Nothing.  It's

             for peace of mind.  It's for the

             principle.

     George doesn't have time for this.  He checks the cylinders

     on his weapon and runs over possible scenarios in his mind.

     But Diego won't get off the soap box.

                             GEORGE

             Jesus fucking Christ, Diego.  I ain't

             telling you.  It's just business.  Now,

             shut up.  You're driving me crazy.

                             DIEGO

             I'm driving you crazy?  No.  You're

             driving me crazy.  We had a dream.  What

             happened to our dream?

     A black sedan pulls up and FIVE PUERTO RICAN MEN approach the

     room.  George and Diego greet them and lead them inside.

     It's game time.  The atmosphere is charged with danger and

     everyone is acutely aware of everything.  The guys sit down,

     their guns bulging through the inside of their suits.  The

     suitcases are opened.  The rules are the same.  No English.

     No raising voices.  No sudden movements.  George offers their

     leader, TONY, beers for his men, and is politely declined.

     The count starts.  George and Diego riff through ten thousand

     dollar bundles.  Diego is still acting pissy.  He's mumbling

     to himself, making faces, slamming the money all around.  The

     guys keep a close eye on him.  Diego finishes a stack, throws

     one of the bags on the ground.  The conversation is in

     Spanish unless otherwise indicated.

                             TONY

             Algun problema?

                             GEORGE

             No no no... no problema, amigo.  El

             dinero esta todo aqui.

             Lleves las "llaves" y mas tarde lo

             contaremos.  Okay?  No problem.

                             TONY

             Que problema?  Nosotros esperamos.

     The pressure is getting to one of the hoods.  His name is

     BENNY.  He's got a crazy eye and he seems ready to snap.

     George resumes the count, but Diego won't get off it.

                             DIEGO

                 (English)

             You embarrassed me, George.  You make me

             look very bad.

                             BENNY

             Que esta diciendo?

                             GEORGE

             Nothing.  Todo esta bien.

                             DIEGO

                 (English)

             Everything is not alright.  I bring you

             in, and you slap my fucking face!

                             GEORGE

             This is not the time, Diego.

     The men all reach for their pieces and all hell starts to

     break loose.

                             TONY

             Hay algun problema?  Hablame!

                             DIEGO

                 (English)

             You fucked me in front of my whole

             family!

                             GEORGE

             Fuck you...I didn't fuck you.

                             BENNY

             Maldita sea, que diablos esta diciendo?

                             GEORGE

             Esta todo aqui, amigo...take the keys.

             Take 'em and go.

                             TONY

             Que esta pasando aqui, jefe?

                             DIEGO

             Sientese ye no se meta en lo que no le

             importa.

     The guns are out and pointed.  It's out of control now.

                             GEORGE

             Take it easy!  Everything's okay!

                             DIEGO

             Que es lo que quieren de me, hijueputas

             campesinos?

     George steps forward with the keys.

                             GEORGE

             Take the fucking keys!

     BLAM!  Courtesy of Benny, George is hit.  The shoulder, the

     collarbone.  It's hard to tell.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Estoy bien, okay?  Everything is

             alright.  There's no problem.  Okay?

             This never happened.  No one has to know

             anything about this.  Diego, I want you

             to calmly tell them where the fucking

             coke is.  Do it now.

                             DIEGO

             Es un Ford blanco junto a una pick-up.

     Tony very carefully takes the car keys.

                             GEORGE

             No problem, gentlemen.  Goodbye.

     The men slowly back out the door.  George looks at Diego.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Derek Foreal.

                             DIEGO

             What?

                             GEORGE

             Derek Foreal.  Derek Foreal.  Derek

             fucking Foreal.  Alright?  The answer to

             all your dreams.  Are you happy now?

     EXT. LOS ANGELES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT - DAY

     George and Diego exit the terminal.  George's arm is in a

     sling.  The familiar sight of Derek Foreal is Lincoln

     Continental.

     The three men come together, and Diego and Derek are

     introduced.  The men's hands come together and the FRAME

     FREEZES on their handshake.

     EXT. EASTHAM HOUSE - UPSTAIRS - DAY

     Fred pulls into the driveway in his new car and honks the

     horn.  Fred and Ermine get out of the car.

                             FRED

             Hello, hello.

     INT. OLIVEROS MANSION - MIAMI - NIGHT

     It's a New Year's Eve party.  A lavish Colombian celebration.

     George and a very pregnant Mirtha move through the crowd to

     find Augusto.

                             AUGUSTO

             I'm so glad you two could make it.

             Mirtha, look at you.  So beautiful.  You

             look like you're about to burst.

                             MIRTHA

             Thanks.  I am.  Where's Martha?

                             AUGUSTO

             I don't know.  Drunk somewhere.  Try the

             bar.  And if you find her, tell her to

             come, it's almost midnight.

     As Mirtha leaves, Augusto throws his arm around George's

     shoulder.

                             AUGUSTO (CONT'D)

             It's good you came down, George.  We

             need to discuss a few things.

                             DIEGO

             Where's Diego?

                             AUGUSTO

             He's not here, George.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, well where is he?  And who is this

             Norman K. guy?  That's all anyone is

             talking about.  Norman K.  Norman K.  Do

             I know him?

     Augusto lets out a big laugh.

                             AUGUSTO

             Norman Cay is not a person.  He is an

             island, George.  In the Bahamas.  From

             what they say, it is free and it's

             Diego's new home.

                             GEORGE

             What?

     Augusto throws an arm around George's shoulder.

                             AUGUSTO

             Let us walk.  From what I understand,

             Diego has bought a hundred and sixty

             acres, a marina, a hotel, and an

             airstrip.

                             GEORGE

             Motherfucker works fast.

                             AUGUSTO

             The word is that soon he is to be king

             of the middle empire.  He is doing

             multiple runs right now and using the

             island as a jump-off point.

                             GEORGE

             He what?

                             AUGUSTO

             Yes.  Jack Stevens is already a very

             busy man.  Along with many others.  You

             shouldn't stay away so long.

                             GEORGE

             That's impossible.  We can't be up and

             running.  Who's distributing?

     Augusto says nothing.  But the ball is dropping in Times

     Square.  10, 9, 8, 7...

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Oh, no.

     Happy New Year.  Streamers, confetti, and champagne.  George

     marches through the kissing guests and over to a phone.  He's

     steaming.  The music is up, so he has to scream.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Hello, Derek?  This is George.  Am I

             wearing lipstick?

             I said, am I wearing lipstick?  Because

             when I'm getting fucked, I want to make

             sure my face is pretty.  You're buying

             directly from Diego, aren't you, you son

             of a bitch?

     INTERCUT

     Derek Foreal in full New Year's regalia, complete with party

     hat.

                             DEREK

             I don't want to get caught in the middle

             of this.  That's between you and Diego.

     George's face scrinches in pain.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             It's nothing personal, George.  Just

             business.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.  I understand.  Just business.

             Right.  Fuck you.

     The song ends, and George is left standing there screaming.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             I bring you in, and this is how you

             repay me?  You little homo!  Hey, Derek?

             Derek?

     INT. OLIVEROS MANSION - DINING ROOM - 1979 - LATER

     It's late.  The family is all there.  Fifteen, twenty strong.

     Cuban coffees all around.

                             MIRTHA

             Que va hacer?

                             AUGUSTO

             Que queres decir.  Que es lo que el va

             hacer?  Pues, no va hacer nada.

                             MARIA

             Alguna cosa tiene que hacer.

                             FAMILY MEMBER #2

             De otra manera, es un marica.

                             FAMILY MEMBER #3

             Un hijueputa

                             FAMILY MEMBER #1

             Maricon.

                             FAMILY MEMBER #2

             Mira, vos sos responsable por el exito

             de Diego.

                             FAMILY MEMBER #3

             El se esta burlando de vos.  Debes hacer

             algo, hombre.

                             MARIA

             No Puedes hacer ni un culo.

                             AUGUSTO

             El no va hacer nada.  Hay un problema.

             Aqui, hubo un error y nosotros lo vamos

             ha arreglar.

                             BLANCA

             No le escusches a mi yerno.  A el solo

             le importa la plata.

     Blanca reaches into her purse, pulls out an ice pick folded

     in a piece of linen cloth, and puts it down in front of

     George.

                             BLANCA (CONT'D)

             Vos lo tenes que matar, ahorita mismo.

             De lo contrario vas a quedar como un

             marica sin horror.

                             FAMILY MEMBER #3

             Mejor dicho vos sos un aculillado.

                             FAMILY MEMBER #1

             Maricon.

                             BLANCA

             Sabes que, vos no tenes pantalones.

             Nadie te va a respetar.  Usa esto.  Deja

             solo un huequito tan pequeno, que ni

             sangre le va a salir a ese malparido del

             Diego.

                             AUGUSTO

             Blanca, por favor.

                             MIRTHA

             Mama, vos sos bien antigua.  Como lo va

             a matar con un picahielo.  Eso era en su

             tiempo, estamos casi ya en los ochenta.

             El lo va a meter un tiro, lo va a volar,

             le va a hechar un hijueputa carro

             encima.

                             AUGUSTO

             Dejen la maricada pues!  No jodan!

             Nadie va a matar a nadie!  George,

             debemos hablarle al Patron, es la unica

             manera, mano.

                             GEORGE

             No, no, no, no yo puedo arregarlo solo.

     EXT. NORMAN CAY - BAHAMAS - 1979 - DUSK

     George cruises through the turqoise water of the Caribbean in

     a sport fisherman.  Before him is Norman Cay.  White sand

     beaches.  Beautiful.  Pristine.

     EXT. NORMAN CAY - DOCKS - DUSK

     Waiting for him is Cesar.

                             CESAR

             Good to see you, George.  It's been a

             long time.

     INT. THE YACHT CLUB - SUNSET

     The Yacht Club is a tavern style bar that juts out over the

     water.  The crimson sky streaks the windows.  Diego looks

     like Che Guavera.  His hair is long, and a graying beard

     sticks through his gaunt face.  The bar has been taken over

     by Diego's BANDITOS.  Automatic weapons and PROSTITUTES

     accent this drunken setting.  George is escorted through the

     door by Cesar, and the room quiets.  All eyes on Diego and

     George.  Diego rises.

                             DIEGO

             George, I am happy to see you.  How are

             you, my brother?

                             GEORGE

             No more brothers, Diego.

                             DIEGO

             Of course we are brothers.  Why do you

             say that?   You hurt me, George.

                             GEORGE

             You fucked me, Diego.

                             DIEGO

             I did not.

                             GEORGE

             You went behind my back and you cut me

             out.

                             DIEGO

             No, I never.  I would not do that,

             George.  Never.

                             GEORGE

             I talked to Foreal, Diego.

     There is a pause.  Diego's goons ready their weapons as Diego

     scoops up a cringer with his pinky and sniffs.

                             DIEGO

             Maybe you are right.  I did betray you a

             little bit.

     One of the men says something in Spanish and everyone laughs.

     George is furious.  He starts to tremble and his face turns

     red.

                             DIEGO (CONT'D)

             Oh, boo hoo, boo hoo.  So sad, George.

             I stole your California connection.  So

             what?  Who introduced you to Pablo

             Escobar?  Me.  Who introduced you to

             your fucking Colombian wife?  Me.  Who

             protected you when my friend Cesar Roza

             wanted to slice your fucking throat,

             huh?  Who mad you millions and millions

             of dollars?  Me.  And what do I get in

             return?  This?  Accusations?  I have

             always given you everything, George, but

             that is over now.  This is my operation.

             My dream.  So go home, George.  Go back

             to your stupid little life.  You can

             sell half grams to your fucking

             relatives for all I care.  Because you

             are out!

     George lunges at Diego and is immediately grabbed.

                             GEORGE

             You'd better kill me now, Diego, because

             you're a dead man.

                             DIEGO

             George, don't be so emotional.  This is

             business.  Besides, I can't kill you,

             you are my brother.

     They lead him away.

     EXT. YACHT CLUB - CONTINUOUS

     George is getting the shit kicked out of him.  His teeth

     broken, kicked in the head, the body, the groin.  His arm

     stomped.  Blood and broken bones.  It's a king size beating.

     The men prop him up and Cesar reaches back and hits him with

     a haymaker.  CRACK.  George's nose is broken.  Blood spurts

     everywhere.  George is dropped to the ground, spit on, and

     left for dead.

                             CESAR

             Say "hi" to your pretty wife for me.

     EXT. HACIENDA LOS NAPOLES - COLOMBIA - POOL - DAY

     A beautiful, sprawling estate.  A family barbecue, Colombian

     style, is in full swing.  Kids play soccer.  Zoo animals run

     wild together.

     George is led outside by TWO OVER-ARMED BODYGUARDS.  Pablo

     sees him and gives George a big hug.

                             ESCOBAR

             George, you look terrible.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, well...

                             ESCOBAR

             Diego?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.

                             ESCOBAR

             Please.  Sit down.  We'll drink some

             scotch.

                             GEORGE

             I didn't come here to drink scotch.

                             ESCOBAR

             I see.  I'm sorry about this, George.

             I'm not happy about this situation.

             It's bad.  You now know who your Brutus

             is.

                             GEORGE

             You know why I'm here.  You know what I

             have to do.  I came here for permission.

             Out of respect, Pablo.  This is

             bullshit, he's making me look like a

             punk.

                             ESCOBAR

             It is very difficult.  Diego makes me a

             lot of money.  If Diego goes so does the

             money.  You were an excellent teacher,

             George.  When the student has learned

             well, the teacher is no longer

             necessary.  We must remember we have

             wives, friends, familia.  Even familia

             that has not been born.  But sometimes,

             we must forget as well.  I am like you.

             I must teach the lesson.  We want to

             teach the lesson.  But we cannot.  We

             must remember that life is the teacher.

                             GEORGE

             You're saying life will take care of

             Diego?

                             ESCOBAR

             Life will take care of everybody.

             Diego, me, you.  It is the teacher.

                             GEORGE

             I get it.   I'm really pissed, Pablo.

             You know the DEA knows about Norman's

             Cay.  For Chrissakes, Diego worships

             Adolf Hitler and John Lennon, that's

             fucked up!

                             ESCOBAR

             I'm sorry, George.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, well, what are you gonna do?  You

             and me, Pablo?  Are we good?

                             ESCOBAR

             Of course, George.  We are beautiful.

             We are brothers.  Real brothers.  Not

             like Diego.  We started this, George.

     Escobar embraces George for a moment, and then George starts

     to move away.

                             ESCOBAR (CONT'D)

             And, George?  The vengance?  It is best

             served cold.

     INT. EASTHAM HOUSE - GEORGE'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

     Mirtha is sleeping.  She's so big, she looks like she's gonna

     explode.  George sits on the bed and rests his hand on

     Mirtha's face.  He looks like the Elephant Man.

                             MIRTHA

             George.  Oh, Jesus Christ, George.  Look

             at you.

                             GEORGE

             Shhh, honey, never mind.  It's alright.

             It's over.  I quit the business.  I'm

             out.

                             MIRTHA

             Pablo said no?

                             GEORGE

             Pablo said no.  It's all over.  And I'm

             never going back.  I have you.  We have

             the baby.  And there's nothing else.

             It's just the family now.  Shhh.  Sleep

             now.

     EXT. EASTHAM HOUSE - DAY

     Fred, Ermine and Mirth are waiting for George in the car.

     Mirtha's water has broken.  Ermine honks the horn from the

     back seat and screams out the window.

                             ERMINE

             George, it's time!  George!  George!

     INT. HOUSE - CONTINUOUS

     George is high and in a panic.  He races around, trying to

     get a suitcase packed and find his keys.

                             GEORGE

             Coming!

     He finally gets it together, but before he runs out the door,

     he does one last blast.

     INT. CAPE COD HOSPITAL - HYANNIS - MATERNITY - DAY

     Mirtha is on the birthing table and screaming in pain.  She's

     crowning.  George wears hospital scrubs and a surgical mask.

     He and his saucer pupils hold Mirtha's hand in comfort.  The

     baby comes, and DOCTOR MICK BAY slaps it's behind and cuts

     the cord.  Tough ass Mirtha breaks down and sobs

     hysterically.  But something is wrong with George.  The color

     drains from his face.  He grabs his chest and falls over onto

     the floor.  The MEDICAL STAFF attends to him.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             Watching my baby girl born did something

             to me.

             They talk about religious experiences, I

             didn't believe in religion.  But when

             Kristina Sunshine Jung came into this

             world, something in me changed.  I

             looked at her and I knew right then that

             I could never love anything but my

             daughter ever again.  It sounds sappy,

             but it was like, click, I knew what I

             was put on this planet for.  It was the

             greatest feeling I ever had followed by

             the worst feeling I ever had.

                             NURSE

             He fainted.

                             MIRTHA

             George!

     The doctor grabs George's wrist.

                             DR. BAY

             He's in tachycardia.  George, your heart

             is racing.  Have you been using drugs?

                             GEORGE

             Coke.

                             DR. BAY

             Cocaine?  How much?

                             GEORGE

             I don't know.  Maybe eighteen grams.

                             DR. BAY

             In how long?  A week?

                             GEORGE

             Today.

                             DR. BAY

             Oh, Jesus, Get me a 12-lead e.k.g. and

             start an i.v. stat!  This man is having

             a heart attack.

     INT. CAPE COD HOSPITAL - HYANNIS - LATER

     George lies in the recovery room, sedated, tubes everywhere.

     He's hooked up to IV's, monitors, and machines.  Dr. Bay

     enters.

                             DR. BAY

             I've reviewed your toxicology report

             three times, George.  I've never seen

             anything like it.  Eighteen grams.

             The lethal dose is a gram and a half.

             You should be in the Guiness Book.

     George cracks a faint smile.

                             DR. BAY (CONT'D)

             It's not funny, George.  You should be

             dead right now.  Absolutely.  I cannot

             come up with one logical explanation for

             why you're still breathing.  I'm not

             here to give you lectures, I've got no

             moral interest in what you do.  But,

             take it easy, George.  Stay with us a

             while.  You've got a daughter now.

     INT. EASTHAM HOUSE - DAY

     Kristina is crying.  Daddy George to the rescue.  He picks

     her up, cuddles her.  Gives her a bottle and she quiets.

     EXT. EASTHAM HOUSE - FRONT YARD - 1980 - DAY

     A one-year-old Kristina is being coaxed by George to take her

     first steps.

                             GEORGE

             Come on.  Come on, honey.  You can do

             it.  Come to Daddy.

     Kristina tries, stumbles.  Gets up again.  She looks like a

     drunk, but she's doing it.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Good girl!

     Mirtha enters.  She's all pinned out, dressed in Ungaro,

     Cartier, and dark sunglasses.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Look, Mirtha.  She's walking.

                             MIRTHA

             She did that before.

                             GEORGE

             No.  These are her first steps.  Watch

             her.

                             MIRTHA

             Yeah.  I know.  She did that before.

                             GEORGE

             But this is...

                             MIRTHA

             I said, I've seen it before.

                             GEORGE

             Alright.

                             MIRTHA

             Can you lift the furnace.  I need money.

                             GEORGE

             Where are you going?

                             MIRTHA

             Out.

     MONTAGE - SERIES OF SHOTS - 1980-85

     HOME MOVIE STYLE & PHOTOGRAPHS

     The years go by and they are SUPERIMPOSED as they pass.

     George, clean and sober, enjoying family life.  Healthy and

     happy.  Mr. Mom.  Mirtha looks worse and worse as her habit

     becomes bigger and bigger.  As George and Kristina grow

     closer and closer, Mirtha is stepping out on the town.

     Blowing money right and left.  Shopping with Mirtha, buying

     clothes, furs, and diamonds.  As Kristina gets older, WE SEE

     her birthday parties.  George and Kristina wearing paper hats

     and eating ice cream.  She's two years old, she's three,

     four, five, six...

     INT. EASTHAM HOUSE - 1985 - NIGHT

     The Eastham house is all done up for a party deluxe.  Fully

     catered, with bartenders, waiters, music, the works.  And of

     course the three c's, champagne, caviar and Colombians.

     George is laughing with Augusto and Martha Oliveros, but when

     Derek Foreal appears in the doorway, George excuses himself

     and walks over.

                             DEREK

             Happy Birthday, George.  Mirtha invited

             me.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.  She told me.

                             DEREK

             Look, I'm sorry about everything.  I

             feel like an idiot.  You were right.  I

             did fuck you.  And then Diego fucked me.

             Cut me out, too.

                             GEORGE

             I heard.

                             DEREK

             I lost sight of everything.  Forgot who

             my friends were.

                             GEORGE

             It's in the past.  I'm out of the

             business now, so forget about it.  No

             hard feelings.  We need to move on.  And

             besides, I'm sorry, too.

                             DEREK

             You?

                             GEORGE

             For calling you a homo.

                             DEREK

             That was out of line.

     George throws his arm around Derek's shoulder.

                             GEORGE

             Good to see you, Derek.

     Mirtha runs in with a giant crystal punch bowl filled with

     mother of pearl.  She holds it over her head triumphantly.

                             MIRTHA

             Now let's fucking party, motherfuckers!

             Let's have some fucking fun.

                             DEREK

             Jesus, is that Mirtha!?

     A very underweight Mirtha nervously runs around the party,

     shoving coke up everyone's noses.  She is gakked to the gills

     and out of control.  Her pupils a mile wide.

                             DEREK (CONT'D)

             Christ almighty, George.  Feed her a

             cheeseburger or something.  What does

             she weight, eighty pounds?

                             GEORGE

             I know.  She needs to slow down.  She's

             going to blow an O-ring.

     Singing.  The birthday cake is brought in, the candles are

     blown out and everyone cheers.

     Mirtha runs over to her husband, still holding the cocaine.

     She's sweaty, her hair matted down on one side.

                             MIRTHA

             Happy birthday, baby.  Do a line.

     She tries to push a line up his nose.

                             GEORGE

             No, that's alright.

                             MIRTHA

             Oh fucking relax.  Let your hair down

             for once.  It's your fucking birthday,

             for Chrissakes.  You're such a fucking

             pussy.  I swear to G-d, I married this

             big time drug dealer and wound up with

             the maid.

     Mirtha's loud now and making a scene.  He thinks about it.

                             GEORGE

             No honey, I'm alright.

                             AUGUSTO

             A toast!  To Mister George Jung.  Mr. I

             95, north and south.  My brother-in-law.

             Happy birthday!

     Everyone raises their glasses.

                             EVERYONE

             To George!

     A party guest comes running inside.

                             PARTY GUEST

             Cops!  They're all over the place.

     The WAITERS, in their white jackets, exchange knowing looks.

     The BARTENDER comes out from behind the bar.

                             BARTENDER

             Freeze!

     In an instant, all of the waiters' guns are out.

                             WAITER

             Massachusetts State Police Department!

             Everybody on the floor!

     EXT. EASTHAM HOUSE - LATER

     Police cars everywhere.  All the party guests are filed out

     the door, and are being led away.  Mirtha is dragged out,

     spitting and screaming.  George, in handcuffs, is pushed to a

     squad car.  He looks through the window to see a FEMALE

     POLICE OFFICER escorting Kristina out of the house.

     INT. M.P.D. - INTERROGATION ROOM - NIGHT

     George, still dressed in his party clothes, sits at a desk.

     TWO DETECTIVES set a confession in front of him.

                             GEORGE

             What's this?

                             DETECTIVE #2

             It's your statement.  How it was all

             yours, the pound of coke was for

             personal use and none of the guests had

             any idea it was there, yeah, right.

     George looks through the papers.

                             GEORGE

             I want my kid out of protective custody.

             Now.  No fucking around.  My wife and my

             kid on a plane tonight.  I sign when

             they call me safe and sound.

                             DETECTIVE #1

             No fucking way.

                             GEORGE

             Fuck you, then.  I sign nothing.

     The detectives ponder.

                             DETECTIVE #2

             Do it.

     Detective #1 walks to the door.

                             DETECTIVE #1

             George?  You better get yourself a good

             lawyer this time.  We're gonna nail your

             ass to the wall on this one.

                             GEORGE

             Oh hey, one more thing?

                             DETECTIVE #1

             What's that?

                             GEORGE

             Get me a six pack.

     EXT. EASTHAM HOUSE - GARAGE - NIGHT

     It's the middle of the night.  George walks through a dark

     and lonely house.  He goes to the furnace, opens it up and

     sees that there are only five stacks left.

                             GEORGE

             Fuck.

     EXT. JUNG HOUSE - WEYMOUTH - PORCH - MORNING

     George pulls up to the front.

                             GEORGE

             Hi.

                             FRED

             I heard.  Ermine, your son is here.

                             ERMINE (O.S.)

             Tell him I don't want to see him.  Tell

             him he's not welcome here.

                             GEORGE

             Mom.

     Ermine's back is to George.  She won't look at him.

                             ERMINE

             Don't you dare step one foot in this

             house.  You're not my son, you hear me?

             I don't have a son anymore.

     She disappears into the house.  The sound of a door slamming.

                             FRED

             She's angry.  It's all over the news.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.  Listen.  I'm going to be going

             away for awhile.

                             FRED

             You're not going to trial?

                             GEORGE

             No.

                             FRED

             Good.

     They stand there and look at each other for a while.  There's

     a lot to say but nothing's coming out.  George hands Fred a

     gym bag.

                             GEORGE

             Give this to Mom, will you?

                             FRED

             Money.  You and your mother.  All the

             time chasing it.  I never understood it.

                             GEORGE

             Give it to her, Dad.  It'll make her

             happy.

                             FRED

             Yeah, I know.  This is it, isn't it?

     The two men throw their arms around each other and hold on to

     one another in the doorway of the old house.

                             GEORGE

             Tell Mom, you know...

                             FRED

             I'll tell her.

     George breaks away and moves to the T-bird.

                             FRED (CONT'D)

             Take care of yourself.

     INT. BANCO DE FEDERALE - PANAMA CITY - 1985 - DAY

     George walks through the bank.

     INT. BANCO DE FEDERALE - PANAMA CITY - CONTINUOUS

     George sits at a desk in front of a Panamanian BANK EMPLOYEE.

     He slides his bank book across the table.

                             GEORGE

             I'd like to make a withdrawal.

     The employee opens the book and gets a funny look on his

     face.  Nervous.

                             BANK EMPLOYEE

             Excuse me, please.

     He gets up and moves to the BANK MANAGER.  They move to

     another MANAGER TYPE.  And another.

     And then everyone disappears behind closed doors.  Finally,

     the BANK PRESIDENT emerges and moves over to George.

                             BANK PRESIDENT

             I'm afraid there is a problem, Mr. Jung.

             The banks have gone through a change, a

             nationalization.  I'm afraid your funds

             have been appropriated by the Panamanian

             Government...

     George starts to shake.  The bank president tries to explain,

     but whatever he says is unimportant.  George is paralyzed.

     INT. APARTMENT - LIBERTY CITY, FLORIDA - NIGHT

     An inexpensive one-bedroom furnished apartment.  It ain't

     much, but it's home.  Mirtha has just received the news and

     is losing her mind.  Clara Blanca is cooking dinner.

                             MIRTHA

             What are we going to do?!  What are we

             going to use for money?!

                             GEORGE

             Please, Mirtha.  I'll start working for

             Augusto.  I'll talk to him tonight.

             I'll do something.

                             MIRTHA

             Don't touch me.  Tell me.  Just answer

             the question.  What do I spend?  What?

             How will we live?

     Kristina sits there.  She hears everything, so does Clara

     Blanca.

                             GEORGE

             Not in front of the kid.

                             MIRTHA

             Don't give me that shit.  You just

             better do something.

     She storms into the bedroom and slams the door.  George

     stands there.  Awkward silence.  George goes to Kristina.

                             GEORGE

             Everything's gonna be okay, sweetheart.

             Don't be upset.

                             KRISTINA

             What's happening to us?

     Tough question to answer.

                             GEORGE

             I don't know.

                             KRISTINA

             Are we gonna split up?

                             GEORGE

             No, never.  Don't even think about that,

             it's impossible.  I love your mother.

             And you are my heart.  Could I live

             without my heart?  Could I?

     Kristina nods "no."  They embrace.

     INT. GEORGE'S THUNDERBIRD - MIAMI - NIGHT

     The car moves along I-95.  George is driving while a jacked

     up Mirtha does a speed bump.  A cop is following in the

     distance.  It is not okay.

                             GEORGE

             There's a fucking cop behind us, Mirtha.

             Be cool, will ya.

                             MIRTHA

             Fuck you, George, just fucking drive.

                             GEORGE

             Hey, why don't you just put a "I'm doing

             cocaine" sign on the car.  What is your

             fucking problem?

                             MIRTHA

             My problem?  We're broke, that's my

             fucking problem.  And you're a fucking

             spy.

                             GEORGE

             What?

                             MIRTHA

             That's right.  Always spying, always

             judging.  Everyone's laughing at you,

             you fucking pussy.  You let Diego fuck

             you in the ass.  Maybe you are a fucking

             faggot.  You must be fucking Diego

             because you're not fucking me.

     Mirtha grabs nuts.

                             GEORGE

             Those are my nuts!

     George tries to fend her off.  The car swerves all over the

     road.  It's turned into a full scale fist fight.  The red

     lights of Florida's finest come up behind them and George is

     pulled over.

     EXT. I-95 - CONTINUOUS

     Mirtha leaps out of the car, teary eyed, crazed and bloodied.

     The policemen step from their car.

                             MIRTHA

             He's a fugitive and a fucking cocaine

             dealer!  There's a kilo in his trunk

             right now!  Take this sorry motherfucker

             to jail!

     George sits behind the wheel.  He knows it's over.

     INT. M.C.I. WALPOLE - VISITING AREA - 1989 - DAY

     SUPERIMPOSE: FOUR YEARS LATER

     Visiting day.  Inmates sit across from their families.

     Mirtha is sitting at the glass.  George walks to his seat.

                             MIRTHA

             I'm divorcing you, George.  I'm getting

             custody of Kristina.  And when you get

             out next week, you're going to pay

             support and that's the end of it.

             Alright?  There's someone else.  I'm

             sorry.

     George just looks at her.  His face is stone.  But he is

     moved.

                             MIRTHA (CONT'D)

             You should have taken better care of me,

             you know?  You've been away a long time.

             Four years.  Say something.

                             GEORGE

             What do you want me to say?  I'm in

             prison.  You should know.  You put me

             here.

                             MIRTHA

             Fuck you, George.  I knew you'd say

             something like that.  Always thinking

             about yourself.

     She moves away and drags nine-year old Kristina into the

     room.

     Kristina yanks her arm away and they get into a heated

     argument.  Through the glass, George can't hear the words but

     it's clear that Kristina doesn't want to be here.

                             GEORGE

             My baby.  She's so big.

     Mirtha forces Kristina over to the glass and keeps showing

     her, prompting her to talk.  Kristina stares at George

     through the glass.  Cool.  Defiant.  Angry.  She picks up the

     phone and speaks, every word an accusation.

                             KRISTINA

             I thought you couldn't live without your

             heart.

     She drops the phone, walks away, and doesn't look back.

     INT. PHONE BOOTH - MIAMI STREETS - DAY

     George puts in the quarters.

                             GEORGE

             Hello, Derek?  It's George.  Yeah.

             Yeah, I am.  I'm in Miami.  I'm looking

             to do something.  I want to put together

             a crew.  Do you know anybody?  Leon?  I

             don't know him.  What's his last name?

             Alright.  Give me the number.

     EXT. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL - MIAMI - DAY

     Nine-year old Kristina Jung leaves school.  George, fresh out

     of prison, moves across the street to meet her.

                             KRISTINA

             What are you doing here?

                             GEORGE

             Nothing.  I just wanted you to know I

             was out.  I just wanted to see you.

                             KRISTINA

             Well, here I am.  See?

                             GEORGE

             How are you doing?

                             KRISTINA

             George, you just can't show up, tell me

             you love me, and have everything be

             okay.

                             GEORGE

             Dad.

                             KRISTINA

             What?

                             GEORGE

             You can call me Dad if you want.

                             KRISTINA

             I don't want, alright?  It's not funny.

             I'm really pissed off, George.  You blew

             it, now leave me alone.

                             GEORGE

             Kristina, c'mon, I'm sorry.  I'm going

             to make this right.  I've got a few

             things going on...

                             KRISTINA

             What do you want from me?

                             GEORGE

             Just to walk with you.  I want to be

             your dad again.

                             KRISTINA

             Do what you want, it's a free country.

     She walks away.  He follows.

     INT. THE PALM LOUNGE - MIAMI - DAY

     George sits at the bar with a man named LEON MINGHELLA.

                             LEON

             It's a four-man operation.  Two on the

             ground.  Two in the air.

                             GEORGE

             Who's the co-pilot?

                             LEON

             You're looking at him.  We provide the

             plane, transportation cost, U.S. landing

             spot, and take it to wherever you want

             it to go.  You provide the pick up point

             in South America, and are responsible

             for payment.  You assume all the bust

             risks.  We take sixty-five percent of

             all transportation fees, ten percent of

             the gross, plus our expenses.

             This is not a negotiation, so if this is

             okay with you, we can talk further.  If

             not, we can forget we had this

             conversation.

                             GEORGE

             Sounds fine.  I'll need to meet

             everybody.

                             LEON

             They're over at the booth.

     Leon leads George over.

                             LEON (CONT'D)

             Gentlemen, this is George.  George, this

             is Ben, G.G. and...

     George's eyes widen as he looks at the last man.  It's Kevin

     Dulli.

                             GEORGE

             Holy shit, Dulli!

                             KEVIN

             Georgie, oh man, hold the mayo!

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             That was it.  Seeing Dulli after

             fourteen years sealed the deal for me.

             The rest was just details.  My end was

             roughly five-hundred thousand.  Kristina

             and I could have a good life for five

             hundred grand.  Start over somewhere.

             One final score.  That's all I needed.

     INT. OLIVEROS MANSION - MIAMI - DAY

                             AUGUSTO

             Three-hundred kilos is a very big load,

             Georgie.  Why don't we start small?

                             GEORGE

             No.  I have the space.  I figured it

             out.  This is what I want to do.

                             AUGUSTO

             Alright.  I'll ask Pablo, tell him it's

             for you.  I don't think there will be a

             problem.

                             GEORGE

             Five-thousand per kilo.

                             AUGUSTO

             Ha ha.  That's too much, Georgie.  Those

             days are over.  The rate is one-thousand

             dollars.  Inflation, you know?

                             GEORGE

             This is a one time thing, Gusto.  One

             and I'm out.  Give me a good price for

             old time's sake.  What do you think?

     EXT. RESIDENTIAL STREET - MIAMI - DAY

     George and Kristina walk through the neighborhood.  He

     carries her books.

                             GEORGE

             Let me ask you something.  If you could

             go anywhere in the world, anywhere,

             where would you want to go?

                             KRISTINA

             You mean, like a trip?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, sure, whatever.

     Kristina thinks about it.

                             KRISTINA

             I don't know.  Maybe California.

     George is amused by her answer.

                             GEORGE

             California?  You can go anywhere in the

             world.  India.  Tibet.  Australia.

             Paris.  And you choose California?

                             KRISTINA

             Yeah.

                             GEORGE

             What is it?  A Disneyland thing?

                             KRISTINA

             No.  I just kind of like the sound of

             it.

                             GEORGE

             California, huh?

                             KRISTINA

             California.

     They turn a corner and arrive at Kristina's house.  Mirtha is

     standing in the doorway.

                             GEORGE

             Go on inside now.  I want to talk to

             your mom alone.

     He kisses his daughter goodbye.

                             KRISTINA

             Bye, Dad.  See you in the morning, okay?

                             GEORGE

             I'll be here.

     George moves over to Mirtha.  It's been a while.

                             MIRTHA

             What do you want?

                             GEORGE

             You knew I was seeing Kristina, right?

                             MIRTHA

             Yeah.  She told me.  You walk her to

             school.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, so I've been thinking.  I love

             her, y'know?  I kind of want to have

             her.  I've been away for so long.  Make

             up for the missed time, you know?

                             MIRTHA

             I haven't seen one dollar from you.  You

             haven't paid me one cent in child

             support, alimony.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, well.  I'm working on that.  I've

             got something going.

                             MIRTHA

             Yeah?  I better see some money out of

             it.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, you will.  Of course.

     Mirtha looks at her ex-husband.  It's not all bad.

                             MIRTHA

             Hey, look.  You start paying, who knows

             what will happen.  You're a good father,

             George.  I always gave you that.  But

             you've got to talk to her.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.

                             MIRTHA

             She's getting big.  Getting her own

             ideas.

                             GEORGE

             I know.  Well, that's all I really

             wanted to say.  So, okay, then.

     He moves down the steps and heads for the sidewalk.

                             MIRTHA

             Hey, George.  You okay?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.  I'm fine.  I'm good.

     INT. THE PALM LOUNGE - DAY

     The restaurant is filled with the team.  They discuss, argue,

     re-examine every little detail.

                             KEVIN

             We take off from Lauderdale, Sunday,

             refuel, and be in Medellin by Monday.

                             LEON

             Overnight, refuel, and back Wednesday

             night.

                             GEORGE

             Where are you coming in?

                             BEN

             Vero Beach.

                             G.G.

             It's good.  It's small.

                             LEON

             Then we drive it to the Lauderdale house

             where it stays until pick up and payment

             the next morning.  You want to go over

             it again?

                             GEORGE

             No.  All set.  Piece of cake.

     INT. GEORGE'S STUDIO APARTMENT - MIAMI - NIGHT

     George is cooking dinner for Kristina.  He's only got a hot

     plate so it's slow.  The table is set with plasticware.

     Kristina chops the salad.

                             GEORGE

             I'm thinking about getting out of town

             this week.  You want to come with me?

                             KRISTINA

             Where are you going?

                             GEORGE

             I don't know.  Maybe California.

                             KRISTINA

             You swear?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.  Go out there, check it out, see

             what it's like.  I've got some stuff to

             do this week, but I'm thinking maybe

             Thursday.  Thursday after school.

                             KRISTINA

             You know I can't.  Mom will never let me

             go.

                             GEORGE

             You let me take care of your mother.

             You just pack your bags.

                             KRISTINA

             But I've got school.

                             GEORGE

             There's schools in California.

                             KRISTINA

             You swear?

                             GEORGE

             That's right.  Three o'clock.  Thursday.

             At your mother's.  You and me.  It's a

             date.

                             KRISTINA

             I don't believe you.

                             GEORGE

             I swear.  On my life.

                             KRISTINA

             Swear on my life.

                             GEORGE

             I swear on your life.

     EXT. VERO BEACH AIRFIELD - DUSK

     George, Ben and G.G. wait on the tarmac.  George is pacing.

     The sound of a Cessna is heard and soon it is dropping out of

     the sky.  The plane lands and taxis over.

     Kevin and Leon stick their fists out of the airplane in

     triumph.  The men quickly unload the plane into the trunks of

     two Broncos and the back of a truck.

     INT. FT. LAUDERDALE HOUSE - NIGHT

     WE FOLLOW the duffel bags out of the Bronco into the house.

     The boys sit around as George samples the product.

                             KEVIN

             Are we good?

                             GEORGE

             Are we good?  Yeah, we're good.  We're

             beautiful.  We're perfect.  This is A

             grade, one-hundred percent pure

             Colombian cocaine, Ladies and Gentlemen.

             Disco shit.  Pure as the driven snow.

             Good riddance.

     He looks the boys over.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             You saved my life, Dulli.  You'll never

             fucking know.  All you guys.  Everyone

             just got a raise.  Instead of ten

             percent, you get fifteen.

                             LEON

             Jesus, George, fifteen percent.  That's

             an extra two-hundred large.

                             GEORGE

             I don't give a shit.  Split it up.  Have

             a great life.  I'm done.  I'm out.

             Starting over.  Cheers.

     They clank.  George gets up and does the Snoopy Dance to the

     bathroom.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Yeah!  Unbelievable.  Dulli, pour us

             another round.  I gotta hit the head.

     George leaves the room.  The camera slowly pans back to the

     guys.  Something doesn't look right.  They have not moved.

     They look bummed.  Leon looks at G.G.

                             LEON

             What?

                             G.G.

             I feel bad.

                             BEN

             Me too.  He's not such a bad guy.

                             KEVIN

             Fuck you guys.  All of you.  I've known

             him for thirty fucking years.  Fucking

             George.

                             LEON

             Yeah, I like him, too.  But what's done

             is done.  So let's not get all

             sentimental about it, okay?

     The CAMERA PANS BACK SLOWLY to the bathroom door, George

     comes back into the room, dancing.  He goes and sits down

     with the guys.

                             GEORGE

                 (laughing)

             Dulli, I was just thinking about that

             time we landed in Mexico.  You've gotten

             a lot better since then, huh pal?

             Remember that fucking landing strip?

             Huh?

     George is the only one smiling.  No one is looking at him.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Hey, what's wrong fellas?  Why the long

             faces?

     He looks at each one.  He slowly realizes something's up.  He

     looks to Dulli finally.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

                 (defeated)

             No.  C'mon, Dulli.

     The front door busts down, agents pour in.  The CAMERA SWISH

     PANS to George.  Lights out.  Slow motion.  Slow dolly into

     XCU.

     EXT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - NEW YORK - 1999 - DAY

     George has tears in his eyes.  He is frozen.  Paralyzed by

     the memories.

                             GEORGE

             Oh, no.

     INT. FT. LAUDERDALE HOUSE - 1989 - DAY

     The voices from the bust can be heard as the CAMERA PUSHES

     SLOWLY into George's face.  Surreal.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             I was busted.  Set up by the FBI and the

             DEA.  That didn't bother me.  Set up by

             Kevin Dulli and Derek Foreal to save

             their own asses.  That didn't bother me.

             Sentenced to sixty years at Otisville.

             That didn't bother me.

     EXT. MIRTHA'S HOUSE - MIAMI - 1989 - DAY

     Nine-year old Kristina Sunshine Jung sits on the front porch

     as the sun goes down.  Her bags are packed and ready to go.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             I had broken a promise.  Everything I

             loved in my life goes away.

     INT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - 1989 - DAY

     George is led into a small room and greeted by his lawyer,

     ARCHIE ZIGMOND.

                             ZIGMOND

             Here's the deal, George.  You're not

             getting out.  I tried to get you

             furloughed, but your mother squashed it.

             Said it would only upset him.  I'm

             sorry.

     George takes it in.  Blinks.  The years have not been kind.

                             GEORGE

             How's he doing?

                             ZIGMOND

             Well, he's out of the hospital, but

             there's not much anyone can do for him.

             It's just a matter of time.  Listen, I

             brought a tape recorder in case you

             wanted to say something to him.  That

             way he could hear your voice.

                             GEORGE

             Right.

     Zigmond sets the tape recorder down and leaves the room.

     George stares long at the machine.  He pushes the record

     button and looks at the red light.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Hello, Dad...

     EXT. JUNG HOUSE - DAY

     A sixty-nine year old Fred shuffles from his house to the

     blue LTD.  He gets in, turns the key, and puts his son's tape

     into the deck.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             You know, I remember a lifetime ago, I

             was about three-and-a-half feet tall,

             weighing all of sixty-pounds, every inch

             your son...

     EXT. JUNG HOUSE - 1953 - DAY

     Six-year old George runs through the leaves to the truck and

     rides to work with his father.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             ...those Saturday mornings going to work

             with my Dad.  We'd climb into that big

             yellow truck.  I used to think it was

             the biggest truck in the world.

     INT. FRED'S LTD. - 1989 - CONTINUOUS

     CLOSE ON FRED

     visibly moved.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             I remember how important the job we did

             was.

             How if it weren't for us, people would

             freeze to death.  I thought you were the

             strongest man in the world.

     FLASHBACK - VISUALS MATCH DIALOGUE

     Ermine as Loretta Young.

     Fred Jung and his son tossing a baseball.

     Tuna and George driving off in the black Oldsmobile

     convertible.

     The FBI arresting George in his old bedroom.

                             GEORGE (V.O.) (CONT'D)

             Remember those home movies when Mom

             would dress up like Loretta Young?  And

             the ice creams and the football games?

             Waino, the Tuna, and the day I left for

             California only to come home with the

             FBI chasing me?

     INT. JUNG HOUSE - GEORGE'S BEDROOM - 1973 - NIGHT

     James J. Trout pulls a handcuffed George's boots over his

     socks as Fred and Ermine watch.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             And that FBI agent, Trout?  When he had

             to get on his knees to put my boots on?

             You said...

                             FRED

             That's where you belong...

     INT. FRED'S LTD. - 1989 - CONTINUOUS

     A choked up Fred repeats the words.

                             FRED

             ...you sonofabitch.  Putting on George's

             boots.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             That was a good one, Dad.  That was

             really something.  Remember that?

     INT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - NEW YORK - 1989 - DAY

     George's eyes well up and he sparks a cigarette, as he keeps

     trying to tell his father goodbye.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             And that time you told me that money

             wasn't real?  Well, old man, I'm forty

             two years old.  I finally learned what

             you tried to tell me so many years ago.

     INT. FRED'S LTD. - 1989 - CONTINUOUS

     Tears come crashing out of the old man's stoic face.

                             GEORGE (V.O.)

             I finally understand.  You're the best,

             Dad.  I just wish I could have done more

             for you.  I wish we had more time.

     EXT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - NEW YORK - 1999 - DAY

     A vision of Fred Jung sits on the ground before his fifty-two

     year old son.

                             GEORGE

             I guess I kind of lost sight of things.

             "May the wind always be at your back and

             the sun always upon your face, and the

             winds of destiny carry you aloft to

             dance with the stars."  Love, George.

                             FRED

             That was a beautiful message.

                             GEORGE

             I meant every word of it.

                             FRED

             Did you know I died two weeks after you

             sent me that tape?

     The apparition of Fred disappears and George is left alone

     once again.

                             GEORGE

             Yeah, Dad.  I knew that.

     INT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - NEW YORK - 1990 - DAY

     George is led into the room where THREE FBI MEN await him.

     One of them is named FRED GARCIA.

                             GARCIA

             How are you doing, George?

                             GEORGE

             What do you guys want?

                             GARCIA

             You hear about your old friend, Diego?

                             GEORGE

             What about him?

     Garcia tosses a newspaper onto the table.  The Miami Herald.

     Inside is a full page letter addressed from Diego Delgado to

     Vice President George Bush.  In the letter, Diego offers to

     make a deal.  In exchange for immunity, Diego will rat out

     the entire cocaine business.  Americans, Colombians, Noriega,

     Escobar, everybody.  Just let him free.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             What the fuck?  Is he going to walk?

                             GARCIA

             He's going down, George.  It's election

             year.  We're not making any deals.

                             FBI GUY #1

             He's never getting out.  Orders from the

             top.

                             GARCIA

             So, how would you like to help us put

             him away?

                             FBI GUY #2

             We've done our homework.  We know you

             hate this motherfucker.

                             GEORGE

             I don't think so.

                             GARCIA

             Don't be stupid, George.  We've got him.

             We've got him dead to rights.  But like

             I said, this is top priority so we're

             handing out free passes on this one.

             And the first one's got your name on it.

             Cut your sentence in half, maybe more.

                             GEORGE

             No thanks, fellas.  You've got the wrong

             fucking guy.  I'm not a rat.

     INT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - VISITOR'S ROOM - 1990 - DAY

     George sits in the chair behind the plexiglass.  Mirtha

     enters and takes a seat on the other side.

                             GEORGE

             Mirtha, what's going on?  Everything

             okay with Kristina?

                             MIRTHA

             Kristina's fine.

                             GEORGE

             Is she here?  Is she coming?

                             MIRTHA

             Is she here?  George, Kristina hates

             you.  You fucked her over one too many

             times.  And I'm not here to socialize.

             Did you hear about Diego?

                             GEORGE

             Yeah.

                             MIRTHA

             Well, I got a call from Pablo.  He said

             this thing with Diego is a disaster.

             He's giving up lab locations, names,

             bank accounts, he was very pissed off.

             Pablo said to take him down.  His exact

             words were "Fuck Diego."

                             GEORGE

             He wants me to testify?  Is that what

             he's asking me to do?

                             MIRTHA

             George, he wasn't asking.

     Mirtha gets up and starts to move away.

                             GEORGE

             Mirtha, how are you doing?

                             MIRTHA

             Better than you.

     INT. COURTHOUSE HALLWAY - JACKSONVILLE - 1990 - DAY

     George, Archie Zigmond and two armed guards walk down the

     corridor.

                             GEORGE

             Hey, Arch, you think the judge will let

             us get a cocktail after this is all

             over?

                             ZIGMOND

             I'll see what I can do, George.

                             GEORGE

             Thanks, Arch.

     They walk into the crowded courtroom.

     INT. COURTHOUSE HALLWAY - JACKSONVILLE - 1990 - DAY

     Packed.  Nuts.  Standing room only.  The courtroom buzzes as

     George is led down the center aisle and is handed off to the

     bailiff.  Over this we hear...

                             CLERK

             Sir, please state your name.

                             GEORGE

             I'm George Jung.  Spelled J-U-N-G.

                             CLERK

             Thank you.

                             PROSECUTOR

             Mr. Jung, do you know Diego Delgado?

                             GEORGE

             Yes, I do.

                             PROSECUTOR

             Do you see him here in the courtroom?

                             GEORGE

             Yes, he's sitting right there at the end

             of the table.

                             PROSECUTOR

             Let the record state the witness has

             identified, Diego Delgado.

     The following sound bytes are dissolved together in montage

     style...

                             PROSECUTOR (CONT'D)

             Mr. Jung, can you describe the

             circumstances of how you began talking

             about cocaine with Mr. Delgado?

                             GEORGE

             Shortly after I arrived at Danbury

             Federal Correctional Institute I related

             to Diego that the crime I was in for was

             smuggling marijuana.

             Diego told me he had high level

             connections in Colombia and they needed

             to find someone to help them transport

             cocaine into America...

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             The first run was fifteen kilos, which

             we smuggled into Logan Airport in hard

             shelled suitcases.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             We wrapped the cocaine in kitchen

             cabinet paper, and duct tape, that way

             if there were any dogs in customs...

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             I introduced Diego to a pilot named Jack

             Stevens, who helped us fly 300 kilos of

             cocaine per week into the United States

             via twin-engine Cessnas.  Jack would fly

             into North Carolina, we'd meet him there

             and drive it down to different

             distribution points...

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             I never met Pablo Escobar.  Diego

             Delgado was my only connection to

             cocaine from Colombia...

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Diego convinced me to keep most of my

             money in a Panamanian bank.  Diego had a

             close relationship with Manuel Noriega.

             In exchange for allowing us to keep our

             money there, we paid him a percentage.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             There was an 85% chance that if you

             snorted cocaine between 1977-1984, it

             was ours. Initially with my LA

             connections, we invented the

             marketplace.  In 1977, there was no

             other real competition.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             The first year we made about 100 million

             dollars between us.  It was an expensive

             operation.  Eventually we built up to

             three different pilots doing multiple

             runs per week, connections on both

             coasts, everything was running smooth.

             We were like a corporation...

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             he was very anti-government.  He talked

             about revolution, forming his own

             country or island, he was looking for

             power as well as money.  I was just

             looking for money.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             He disliked the United States, thought

             it was a police state.  He hoped that by

             flooding the country with cocaine, it

             would disrupt the political system and

             tear down the morality of the country.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Well, yes, Derek Foreal was my

             connection, I met him back in 1968 when

             I first moved to Manhattan Beach.  It

             was Foreal's marijuana connections that

             kicked off our cocaine market.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             Yes, it was my idea to bring the kilos

             to Los Angeles.  When Diego finally got

             Derek Foreal's name from me, it was only

             a matter of months before he'd cut me

             out.

                             GEORGE (CONT'D)

             I'm not sure how my relationship with my

             daughter and ex-wife have anything to do

             with this trial.  I mean we're here to

             talk about Diego Delgado, aren't we?

                             CALIBANOS

             Yes, we are Mr. Jung.

     We come out of the montage, the defense attorney Diego

     Delgado, Joe Calibanos, a sleazy-Greek-like-ex-basketball

     weight lifter guy is now doing the questioning.

                             CALIBANOS (CONT'D)

             Mr. Jung, you're a convicted felon,

             correct?

                             GEORGE

             Yes, I am.

                             CALIBANOS

             Do you have any agreement or

             understanding whatsoever with the United

             States government in regards to your

             testimony?

                             GEORGE

             No, I cam here out of my own volition.

                             CALIBANOS

             Excuse me?

                             GEORGE

             Something about vengance being best

             served cold.

                             CALIBANOS

             Really.  Are you getting paid, Mr. Jung?

                             GEORGE

             Excuse me?

                             CALIBANOS

             Mr. Jung, don't you have an agreement or

             understanding with the United States

             Government in connection with your

             testimony in this case?

                             GEORGE

             I'm doing sixty years at Otisville, no

             chance of parole.  Even if they cut my

             sentence in half I'll be seventy-three

             years old.  That's some fucking deal.  I

             don't know if the parole board, the

             judge, the pope or Jesus Christ himself

             can get me out of here.  I have a really

             bad record, I'm not sure what's going to

             happen.

                             CALIBANOS

             So you do have an agreement with the

             United States Government, Mr. Jung,

             correct?

     George can't respond.  Looks to Diego.  Looks from the jury,

     the judge, George is on the spotlight and it's uncomfortable.

     He feels suddenly sleazy.

                             CALIBANOS (CONT'D)

             I thought so.  No more questions.

     Silence.  The judge tells George he can step down.  Calibanos

     laughs quietly with associates.  George is bummed.  He walks

     by Diego.  They look at each other.

                             GEORGE

             You shouldn't have taken the 30 million,

             Diego, I was out.

     George is lead away.

                             CLERK

             The court calls Mr. Jack Stevens.

     Jack Stevens is lead to the stand.  WE SLOWLY DISSOLVE TO:

     INT. CAR - 1999 - DAY

     The green of the New York State countryside drifts by as a

     brown Mazda moves along Highway 19.  Behind the wheel is a

     beautiful 20 year old woman wearing dark sunglasses.  She

     drives absently, her mind somewhere else.

     INT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - VISITOR'S ENTRANCE - 1999 - DAY

     The woman is buzzed through the double doors.  She moves to

     the MAN behind the desk and takes off her sunglasses.

                             KRISTINA

             I'm here to see my father.

                             ADMISSIONS OFFICER

             Name?

                             KRISTINA

             Kristina Sunshine Jung.

     EXT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - LATE AFTERNOON

     The GUARDS are rounding up the other prisoners and escorting

     them inside, but George is still planting sunflowers.

                             GUARD

             Hey, George, five more minutes, buddy.

     INT. VISITOR'S ENTRANCE - CONTINUOUS

     The admissions officer looks up from his paperwork.

                             ADMISSIONS OFFICER

             Jung.

     Kristina grabs her papers and moves to the counter.

                             ADMISSIONS OFFICER (CONT'D)

             Belongings in here.

     Kristina empties her pockets and deposits her possessions

     into a locker box.  She is handed a key.

                             ADMISSIONS OFFICER (CONT'D)

             Feet on the blue line.

     Kristina stands on a blue piece of tape and the admissions

     officer buzzes open the giant metal door.  But Kristina

     doesn't move.

                             ADMISSIONS OFFICER (CONT'D)

             Miss?

     He presses the buzzer again, but she just stands there.

                             ADMISSIONS OFFICER (CONT'D)

             Miss?  Something wrong?

     EXT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - CONTINUOUS

     George turns around as a GUARD taps him on the shoulder.

                             GUARD

             George?  George, come on.  You've got a

             visitor.

     George looks up to find Kristina being buzzed through the

     gate.  She moves through the open area and onto the grass

     quickly.  SLOW MOTION: Father and daughter come together at

     last in a long embrace.

                             GEORGE

             I'm sorry, baby.  I'm so sorry.

                             KRISTINA

             It's alright, Dad.

                             GEORGE

             I didn't mean to...

                             KRISTINA

             I know, Dad.  I know...

     He hugs her hard.

                             GEORGE

             I fucked up.

                             KRISTINA

             Shhhh.

                             GEORGE

             I love you.  I love you so much.  You've

             got to know that.  You've got to know.

                             KRISTINA

             I know, Dad.  I love you too.

                             GEORGE

             After everything.  After everything, the

             only thing left out of my whole life is

             you.

     Kristina looks at her father, smiles, and disappears.  There

     was no Kristina.  The guard continues to tap.

                             GUARD

             George?  George, come on.  It's getting

             dark.

     George looks up to find a prison guard.  His name is GUS, and

     he helps George to his feet.

                             GEORGE

             But I have a visitor.

                             GUS

             Not today, George.  Time to go back.

                             GEORGE

             But I want to put her name on the list

             for tomorrow.  My daughter.

                             GUS

             Okay, George.

                             GEORGE

             Because she's visiting me.

                             GUS

             We'll do that tomorrow, okay?  It's

             lockdown time.

     The shadows grow long, and Gus leads George down a cement

     path that cuts through the grass.  The huge structure of

     Otisville looms dark against the sky, and Gus and George take

     the long walk back.

     EXT. OTISVILLE F.C.I. - NEW YORK - DUSK

     Standing outside the fences, Kristina smokes a cigarette as

     she watches her father being led away.  After a few moments,

     she turns around, walks to her car and gets in.  Time to go

     home.  And as the brown Mazda pulls out of the driveway, the

     taillights turn red, growing smaller and smaller, until they

     finally disappear.

     THE END.

    Questo copione è stato visto
  • 0 volte nelle ultime 48 ore
  • 0 volte nell' ultima settimana
  • 0 volte nell' ultimo mese
  • 14 volte nell' arco di un'anno